Fresh Air Weekend: Jacqueline Woodson; 'The Get Down'; 'Unheard Byrd'; 'Square Meal'

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Married culinary historians Jane Ziegelman and Andy Coe, authors of <em>A Square Meal, s</em>ay the country's decade-long Great Depression had a lasting impact on American diets.
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Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

Jacqueline Woodson's 'Brooklyn' Is Full Of Dreams And Danger: The National Book Award winner's new novel is based in part on her memories of growing up in Brooklyn in the 1970s. Woodson describes the teen years as an "amazing and urgent moment" in life.

Hip-Hop Meets Disco On The Electrifying Soundtrack To 'The Get Down': A new drama series on Netflix chronicles the rise of early hip-hop music in the late '70s. Rock critic Ken Tucker says the show's soundtrack is dense, complex and delightful.

'Unheard Bird' Gives Fresh Insight Into Charlie Parker's Musical Genius: Decades after Parker's death, a new album compiles previously unknown performances by the alto sax legend. Critic Kevin Whitehead says the record will please both jazz experts and casual listeners.

Creamed, Canned And Frozen: How The Great Depression Revamped U.S. Diets: During the Depression, cheap, nutritious and filling food was prioritized — often at the expense of taste. Jane Ziegelman and Andy Coe, authors of A Square Meal, discuss food trends of the time.

You can listen to the original interviews here:

Jacqueline Woodson's 'Brooklyn' Is Full Of Dreams And Danger

Hip-Hop Meets Disco On The Electrifying Soundtrack To 'The Get Down'

'Unheard Bird' Gives Fresh Insight Into Charlie Parker's Musical Genius

Creamed, Canned And Frozen: How The Great Depression Revamped U.S. Diets

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