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Fresh Air Weekend: 'Blood Will Out,' An Opera Powerhouse And A Reading

Saturday, March 22, 2014

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors, and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

'Blood Will Out' Reveals Secrets Of A Murderous Master Manipulator: Author Walter Kirn thought he was befriending an eccentric Rockefeller, but his pal turned out to be an impostor wanted for murder. Kirn's new book explores the depths of that deception.

A Poetry Reading: 'To My Oldest Friend, Whose Silence Is Like A Death': Fresh Air's classical music critic Lloyd Schwartz recently published a poem about friendship and loss on Poets.org.

For Opera Powerhouse Dolora Zajick, 'Singing Is Connected To The Body': The mezzo-soprano discovered opera as a 22-year-old pre-med student. She took "a crack at a singing career" and has been at the Metropolitan Opera for 25 years. Now she's helping emerging singers.

You can listen to the original interviews here:

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Source: NPR

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About Fresh Air

"If you want to understand a political conflict, it helps to understand the culture in which that conflict is taking place," says host Terry Gross. Fresh Air is one of the most popular programs on public radio, breaking the "talk show" mold, and Gross is known for her fearless and insightful interviews with prominent figures in American arts, politics, and popular culture. "When there is a crisis in a foreign country, we sometimes call up that country's leading novelist or filmmaker to get the cultural perspective." Fresh Air features daily reports and reviews from critics and commentators on music, books, movies, and other cultural phenomena that invade the national psyche.

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