Streams

Feds: One Year of Car Crashes Cost the U.S. $871 Billion

Thursday, May 29, 2014 - 10:28 AM

traffic crash, flipped car (Abelardo Gonzalez/flickr)

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration says one year of traffic crashes costs $277 billion in direct economic losses and another $594 billion in harm from the loss of life and pain from injuries. 

"No amount of money can replace the life of a loved one, or stem the suffering associated with motor vehicle crashes," said U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx. "While the economic and societal costs of crashes are staggering, today's report clearly demonstrates that investments in safety are worth every penny used to reduce the frequency and severity of these tragic events."

The new study, which was released Thursday, calculated the price tag stemming from the 32,999 fatalities, 3.9 million non-fatal injuries, and 24 million damaged vehicles that took place in 2010. According to NHTSA, it's equivalent to 1.9 percent of the $14.96 trillion Gross Domestic Product for that year.

NHTSA says crashes involving drunk driving, speeding or distracted driving accounted for over a half of the total cost.

Read the full study here.

So far this year, 96 people have been killed in car crashes in New York City. TN is tracking them here.

Tags:

The Morning Brief

Enter your email address and we’ll send you our top 5 stories every day, plus breaking news and weather.

Comments [1]

Chang from Manhattan

96 so far says previous efforts in Mayor Bberg didn't work out. What's new now? Why is perspective always fixed from non-drivers to cars (not drivers inside) only. All causes are cars, so make cars slow down and enforced.

I would advise that shifting a perspective will help solve problem better. Maybe drivers are stressed out by disorderly pedestrians and bikers who get away with all kinds of violation without any guilt or sense of wrong doing? Left turn complication (in two ways) gets worse by bikers in wrong direction and by bikers who only insist right of way (in one way) but don't know driver's blind spot because they don't have driving experience therefore contributing none to reduce emission but to increase congestion by designated bike paths all year round in Manhattn which make cars crawls slower than bikes which have no merit of free space because they are not ABCD (Added Bikers Converted from Drivers).

How is it possible city is only tuned to fatalities of peds and bikers but not of drivers and occupants who make up majority of 96 ( maybe 40%)? Something can be done to save motorist life also? Like seatbelt tickets and airbag inspection?

I'm afraid number will be over 200 (average 180 in NYC) in the end of 2014. But it's not my wish. So I will give my blessing to NYC.

God Bless NYC and ME.

May. 30 2014 08:19 PM

Leave a Comment

Email addresses are required but never displayed.

Sponsored