Edward Hopper's Paintings Invaded by Social Media

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Nastya Nudnik places social media icons and emojis in works of art, like Edward Hopper's <em>Sunday</em> (1926)

Edward Hopper’s depictions of modern American life are full of loneliness, regret, and boredom — emotions that, 70 years later, social media seems to have heightened. But Nastya Nudnik has fun with that in her series Emoji-nation.

A man sitting by himself with Instagram’s “no followers” symbol confirms our suspicions about that vacant stare. When a boy's kiss is returned with iMessage's “…”, we don't have to wait for the full reply to know that she's just not that into him.

Scroll down to see some of the images.

Nudnik got inspired to create the series when she realized that some emoji were remarkably similar to some famous faces in fine art: the “shocked” emoji looks an awful lot like Edward Munch’s The Scream, no? Even God isn't above the laws of social media: His Facebook profile gets the message "Sorry, this user already has too many friend requests.”

You can see more of Nudnik's work here.

Nastya Nudnik places social media icons and emojis in works of art.

Nastya Nudnik places social media icons and emojis in works of art. (Nastya Nudnik)

 

Edward Hopper's Summer Evening (1947).

Edward Hopper's Summer Evening (1947). (Nastya Nudnik)

 

Edward Hopper's Conference At Night (1949).

Edward Hopper's Conference At Night (1949). (Nastya Nudnik)

 

Edward Hopper's Excursion into Philosophy (1959).

Edward Hopper's Excursion into Philosophy (1959). (Nastya Nudnik)

 

Edward Hopper's Sunlight in a Cafeteria (1958).

Edward Hopper's Sunlight in a Cafeteria (1958). (Nastya Nudnik)

 

The "shocked" emoji and Edward Munch's The Scream (1893).

The "shocked" emoji and Edward Munch's The Scream (1893). (Nastya Nudnik)