Streams

Donor Siblings are Finding Ways to Connect

Thursday, December 05, 2013

Wendy Kramer, founder and director of the Donor Sibling Registry and co-author, with Naomi Cahn, of Finding Our Families: A First-of-Its-Kind Book for Donor-Conceived People and Their Families (Avery Trade, 2013) , talks about a new development in family ties, connecting brothers and sisters who share DNA through their sperm, embryo and egg-donor parents.  Wendy Kramer is also an associate producer of MTV's docu-series "Generation Cryo" airing Mondays at 10.

 

Guests:

Wendy Kramer
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Comments [10]

SKV from NYC

Just as a child's right to child support cannot be signed away, their right to know who their parents are should not be signed away. Every person has a right to know.

Dec. 05 2013 05:13 PM
Joseph Hutchins from Bronxville

I'd like to hear much more about the subject brought up by the manager of a sperm bank from New Jersey at the end of this segment: The decline in quality and quantity of human sperm over recent decades. I heard about this from a medical school student friend of mine about 12 years ago but it's never in the news. How can we engage in any activism to improve health, social, and cultural outcomes while we ignore a clear and possibly irreversible threat to our own reproduction?

Dec. 05 2013 12:06 PM
Joseph Hutchins from Bronxville

I'd like to hear much more about the subject brought up by the manager of a sperm bank from New Jersey at the end of this segment: The decline in quality and quantity of human sperm over recent decades. I heard about this from a medical school student friend of mine about 12 years ago but it's never in the news. How can we engage in any activism to improve health, social, and cultural outcomes while we ignore a clear and possibly irreversible threat to our own reproduction?

Dec. 05 2013 12:03 PM
jgarbuz from Queens

We should start getting used to the idea that production of children outside the womb and in factories with no "family" is the inevitable end of this process. The end of tribe and "family" is inevitable, but just a matter of time and technology.

Dec. 05 2013 11:43 AM
jgarbuz from Queens

We should start getting used to the idea that production of children outside the womb and in factories with no "family" is the inevitable end of this process. The end of tribe and "family" is inevitable, but just a matter of time and technology.

Dec. 05 2013 11:42 AM
jm

I have two half-siblings conceived by my father's donor sperm, in the mid-'70s. My mother worked in the office of the ob-gyn involved, and he had a program which encouraged volunteers by word of mouth. My father participated for fun, because the idea of test tube conception was basically science fiction to him. Only my mother knew the donation was successful on two occasions until she revealed it to me in the early 2000s!

My mother is deceased, but my father and sister and I would love to meet the brother and sister if they wanted to reach out. I did manage to get the first name of the boy from my mother, since I didn't want to accidentally date him. :)

Dec. 05 2013 11:42 AM
kate from Manhattan

I'm a single mother of young son and I used an anonymous donor to conceive. I always felt that it was best to be honest. Because this is ultimately a story about love and generosity and secrecy suggests shame or that something is wrong. It doesn't mean there aren't questions and a sense of something missing. But if you are being truthful then it makes those questions and feelings much easier to discuss and process. Because it's really about being in a community of people who love you.

Dec. 05 2013 11:39 AM
Emily

Sperm banks now offer "open" donors, where donors sign up giving any children conceived from his donation to contact him when they turn 18. So it's not all anonymous now.

Dec. 05 2013 11:38 AM
Truth & Beauty from Brooklyn

What I think should be of more importance is making sure that donor siblings don't accidentally meet and marry or meet and conceive. Have you discussed this in your group?

Dec. 05 2013 11:36 AM
jgarbuz from Queens

The search for "roots" is a natural instinct. Most people want some historical framework for their existence, why they exist and "where did I come from." This will continue until babies are produced in factories and nobody will have "parents." The very notion of searching for "roots" or for "offspring" will become nonexistent.

Dec. 05 2013 11:35 AM

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