Divided We Stand? The American Battle Between Women's Rights and Family Values

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Political divisiveness in the United States has shaped female positions on gender politics and feminism.
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In the early 1970s, there was great support for women's rights and constitutional equality with a bipartisan consensus that advocated, rallied, and lobbied to push through the Equal Rights Amendment

Less than a decade later, feminists and their conservative challengers were lined up on opposite sides of the battle as Republicans recast themselves as a party of "family values" in opposition to feminism. That turning point occurred during the 1977 National Women's Conference, which produced a rift that remains today, 40 years later.

How has political divisiveness in the United States shaped female positions on gender politics and feminism? Marjorie Spruill, a history professor at the University of South Carolina and author of the book, "Divided We Stand: The Battle Over Women's Rights and Family Values that Polarized American Politics," weighs in.