Streams

Defending Common Core

Tuesday, December 10, 2013

Merryl Tisch, chancellor of the New York State Board of Regents, talks about the continued rollout of Common Core standards as she and State Education Commissioner John King hold forums to hear parents' concerns.

Guests:

Merryl Tisch
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Comments [30]

NCLB - the advent of high stakes testing - wastes up to one third of classroom time 'teaching to the test' rather than critical thinking and mathematical skills.

Ms. Tisch's premise that domestic manufacturing has suffered because of the poor skills of American workers is just plain wrong. American workers are paid way more (relative to foreign workers) therefore it American employers spend more on automation to make the products efficiently. Creating and maintaining those robots make take brains, but using them? Not so much. [viz. How our military uses modern UI/game design to train soldiers and pilots.]

Common Core appears to these non-educational professionals eyes to be untested but can it be worse than 13 weeks of classroom time spent preparing for a multiple choice test?

Two steps that Congress could take to put Americans back to work today? Eliminate capital gains rates for non-domestic investment. Make 50+ year old citizens Medicare 'eligible'.

If we want to make school time more useful bring back some humanities...Art, music, sports, etc. Things that make a life worth living.

Dec. 12 2013 11:42 AM

"It is even okay to fail, because most times this is what helps you to grow."

Same siren song that has been employed to protect the tenure of a failing educational bureaucracy dedicated to its mission of self aggrandizement and self preservation.

Having determined that some children are "advantaged" over others by virtue of the financial and educational achievements of their parents, the progressive "equalizers" have devised a curriculum that is inaccessible to parental assistance; binding students to the values and opinions of their school teachers and alienating them from their parents who are perceived as unable to assist.

If you want your children, you're going to have to fight for them. They'll love you for it.

Dec. 11 2013 03:25 PM

Ms. Yanulis:

"No call-ins? No push-back?"

The Tisch fortune paid for this airtime, and WNYC is a bit more appreciative of financial contributions (not like those ungrateful teachers who are seemingly ungrateful for Bloomberg's largesse to them.)

Dec. 11 2013 12:20 PM
Heidi Yanulis from Port Washington

No call-ins? No push-back? On such as important topic? This was a very pandering interview.

Dec. 11 2013 12:55 AM
Phil from Flushing

It appears Tisch's only actual teaching experience was in religious schools. Why, other than her many powerful political connections, is she given any quarter in public education?

Dec. 10 2013 04:19 PM

. . .

“Merryl knows a lot of people, and she uses her access judiciously, but she uses it.”

. . .

The elder Tisch, who died in 2003, and his brother, Robert, who died in 2005, started in real estate and hotels and then purchased Lowes Theaters. They added Lorillard Tobacco Co., Bulova Watch Co., CNA Financial (insurance) and an offshore drilling company.

The Tisch family also had a controlling interest in CBS from 1986 to 1995, and Robert was a co-owner of the New York Giants, as is his son, Steve Tisch, the film producer.

Laurence and Robert Tisch and their children may be best known for giving away money.

Evidence of their generosity is everywhere in New York City. There’s the Tisch School of the Arts at New York University, the Tisch Hospital at NYU Medical Center, the Tisch Galleries at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

James and Merryl Tisch alone recently pledged $40 million to Mount Sinai Medical Center. . . . "

http://news.muckety.com/2009/04/08/merryl-tisch-brings-myriad-connections-to-nys-education-post/14211

Dec. 10 2013 03:02 PM

@Phil from Flushing

Loved the link.

http://ednotesonline.blogspot.com/2013/09/merryl-tisch-might-as-well-be-crook.html

Common core can be defeated - Ms. Tisch is sounding tired.

Dec. 10 2013 02:41 PM
Phil from Flushing

Read:

http://ednotesonline.blogspot.com/2013/09/merryl-tisch-might-as-well-be-crook.html

The fix is in, folks. The Common Core will not go away anytime soon.

Dec. 10 2013 02:30 PM

Commissar - I mean Commissioner Tisch is puzzled by the negative reaction of the teachers towards Mayor Blumberg. After all, she seems to say, he gave them a lot of money. Imagining that such a payoff would take be sufficient to anesthetize their integrity. The Tischs are most familiar with that use of wealth. My impression is that the good commissioner is only one verbal slip away from going totally "Cathy Black".

Dec. 10 2013 02:27 PM
Mike from Brooklyn

She's puzzled as to why teacher's don't like Bloomberg. Has she forgotten that Joel Klein used to scapegoat teachers in order to curry favor with the local tabloids? Or that he used to tour the country saying that teachers were the biggest obstacle to fixing the schools?

Dec. 10 2013 11:55 AM
Public School Mom from Brooklyn, NY

Very patronizing to teachers, "I do know we need to work with teachers." I should hope so!

Chancellor, with all respect, if you were talking to teachers you would know with clarity why Bloomberg has built his legacy as the anti-teacher, anti-public school mayor.

Dec. 10 2013 11:53 AM
Kim from Brooklyn

Wow. It is hard to believe you guest is an educator. The reason relations between teachers and Bloomberg broke down is because of his utter lack of respect for the profession. She seems to think just because teachers saw pay raises they should love Bloomberg's education policies. Pay has little to do with it. Good teachers want to be treated with respect due to professionals, not restrictions and mandates that limit us like we are just skilled line workers.

Dec. 10 2013 11:53 AM
Bob from Huntington

Brian,

Was that an interview or a paid political announcement?

An utterly useless segment.

Dec. 10 2013 11:50 AM
seamus

Agreed, Tony from Canarsie. Not Brian's finest hour. Oh well.

Dec. 10 2013 11:49 AM
Patricia from Westcehster

I've heard Ms. Tisch on WNYC before and don't know why you bother. It has been made clear that she has strong financial ties to the station and is quite friendly with some of the interviewers and they therefore cannot present an unbiased interview or even ask any type of challenging questions. What a shame.

Dec. 10 2013 11:49 AM
Anna from New York City

She says the reason that manufacturers and businesses are NOT coming to New York State is because we have an "unprepared workforce." I believe that the USA had been incentivizing businesses to go overseas for many, many years before the birth about common core. Common Core will not fix NY State's economic problems.

Dec. 10 2013 11:48 AM
Anna from New York City

She says the reason that manufacturers and businesses are NOT coming to New York State is because we have an "unprepared workforce." I believe that the USA had been incentivizing businesses to go overseas for many, many years before the birth about common core. Common Core will not fix NY State's economic problems.

Dec. 10 2013 11:48 AM
Diana from NYC

Does anyone else find that Ms. Tisch has a very annoying way of speaking? Over-articulated, breathy & whispery with a scolding undertone. I wouldnt comment on this except that I think it expresses her attitude.

Dec. 10 2013 11:48 AM
Thomas from Tribeca

What Ms. Tisch is missing is the fact that if the curriculum was rich in content, the local boards wouldn't need to find it necessary to teach to the test. Right now, the curriculum - particularly Common Core - only stresses reading, math and science. In the Common Core curriculum, there is no mention of history, civics, the arts, career or project based learning.

In my opinion, test scores are a reflection of the curriculum.

Dec. 10 2013 11:48 AM
Tsol

This woman is ponderous. God help any students if she ever taught school.

Dec. 10 2013 11:46 AM
Juan from White plains

No resources provided to teachers and students.

Dec. 10 2013 11:45 AM
Ken from Bronx

Please don't neglect the question suggested by "Dennis from New York City":

**Please ask the Chancellor what metric(s) would suggest that the Common Core Standards has not been successful?**

This is an incredibly insightful question, no matter what side of the issue you are on.

Dec. 10 2013 11:45 AM
Tony from Canarsie

Is this an interview or a speech? Ask some questions, Brian!

Dec. 10 2013 11:45 AM
Bob from Huntington

Admissions Counselors at some of the country's best colleges will tell you they often find themselves turning away qualified students from Long Island and Westchester--because they get far too many applicants from these areas.
Why? Because these areas do an excellent job of preparing their students for the Ivy League, etc.

While the Common Core may be a possible solution to the problems of New York City schools, it should not be inflicted on districts that are performing well--in fact, better than well--where it is a detriment to what they have been doing.

One size does not fit all, Chancellor Tisch.

Dec. 10 2013 11:44 AM
MCRM from Brooklyn, NY

It's a Business Model, not an Education Model

Common Core INC: The curriculum/testing industrial complex

Why am I --a parent with limited income-- dishing out a monthly donation to my child's PTA to cover BASIC SUPPLIES, music and art, and to support teacher's PD when $28 million is going for the production of homogenized, scripted, convoluted curriculum from the state that GOOD teachers will refuse to use?

Why is NYS paying in excess of one million dollars for Kindergarten curriculum modules in math to Common Core Inc? This is over 28 million for K-12 math and ela modules--altogether more than 2 million a grade to Common Core Inc?

Why are you spending OUR TAX MONEY FOR OUR CHILDREN on this corporation that can't possibly develop curriculum better than my son's own teacher?

We have a leadership problem, not a teacher problem in the state. I am not against common core, I'm against the misuse of education for profits that goes hand in hand with uncritical, shallow curriculum.

Dec. 10 2013 11:44 AM
Mr. Bad from NYC

English/Math/Science are important but only if you're going on to college. What a waste of time. This woman thinks a "common core" will allow employers to bring in high tech manufacturing? Get real. Vocational training/apprenticeship is the reason Germany has some of the best techs and manufacturing in the world. Try that. More than 1/2 of German HS students follow this path:

http://www.npr.org/2012/04/04/149927290/the-secret-to-germanys-low-youth-unemployment

Please get off the PreK bandwagon, just a money pit.

Dec. 10 2013 11:43 AM
Ken from Bronx

Education is a high stakes business. If a kid doesn't get needed skills in school, that kid suffers real consequences.

Tests are "high stakes" because the stakes actually *ARE* high.

Teachers who don't want to be judged on High Stakes tests should have chosen a less important, Low Stakes profession like fashion design, or drumming in a rock band.

Nobody cares if a Fashion Designer messes up. But if a 4th grade teacher messes up, that is a big problem.

Dec. 10 2013 11:43 AM
Ken from Bronx

Education is a high stakes business. If a kid doesn't get needed skills in school, that kid suffers real consequences.

Tests are "high stakes" because the stakes actually *ARE* high.

Teachers who don't want to be judged on High Stakes tests should have chosen a less important, Low Stakes profession like fashion design, or drumming in a rock band.

Nobody cares if a Fashion Designer messes up. But if a 4th grade teacher messes up, that is a big problem.

Dec. 10 2013 11:42 AM
seamus

She's dodging the question. It's nt about the rollout or need. IT's that this is the wrong solution.

Dec. 10 2013 11:37 AM
Dennis from New York City

Please ask the Chancellor what metric(s) would suggest that the Common Core Standards has not been successful?

Dec. 10 2013 11:35 AM

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