Streams

Dedication of WNYC Transmitter Site in Greenpoint

Sunday, October 31, 1937

This episode is from the WNYC archives. It may contain language which is no longer politically or socially appropriate.

"New York City's Own Station, WNYC"

Lots of hiss but improves as program continues.

Tommy Cowan announces the playing of the National Anthem which is sung by Julia Peters. Police and Sanitation Bands play.

Commissioner of Plant and Structures Kracke announces the opening of the new 1,000 watt transmitter at Greenpoint, Brooklyn. Describes WNYC as "nearly a useless shambles" when La Guardia came into office in 1933. The transmitter was located on the 25th floor of the Municipal Building which was surrounded by tall buildings that caused interference called "dead spots." Ground was broken in November 1935 and in less than two years a dilapidated, discarded ferry slip 'gave place' to this beautiful new building that houses your station's transmitter…will increase the daytime power from 1,000 to 5,000 watts if the FCC allows for plans now before it. Transmitter has automatic frequency control and high fidelity modulation capability. This means there is no finer station their your own WNYC and is on a par with the highest quality station in the United States. Refers to the 300 + foot towers. Talks of testing of "micro ray" like the one used by the Pope at his summer palace just outside of the Vatican. It is to be used for emergencies in any kind of weather or atmospheric conditions - another milestone for New York City.

James Cunningham leads Department of Sanitation Band.

Mayor La Guardia speaks. WNYC is New York's OWN station. We found the station in a dilapidated condition and we sought to build it up through the WPA and the Department of Plant and Structures. Today this is the power station, and it is right up to the last minute in all of its equipment. The micro ray system installed here is the only one in the country. And the only one in use outside of the Vatican. La Guardia says he plans to improve the programs. Vast educational programs. Wanted to enlarge staff but despite budget cuts but still hopes to recoup some of the lost spots. Regular programs and courses on educational subjects. Wants to get the FCC to allow inter-station short wave communication to retransmit on our regular frequency - the very finest educational courses. FCC said all inter-station communication must be by wire and not shortwave. Will reapply. Good for telephone company. Thanks Harry Hopkins of the federal government. Talks about work relief.

Police, Fire and Sanitation bands play with the Mayor conducting.

Tommy Cowan describes the scene of bands getting together. Cowan says the Mayor will now inspect the transmitter site. (Sound quality improves as program moves along.)

Closing announcer - Gene Marshall.

Added 2011-02-14: (LT941) Kracke introduces the president of the Borough of Brooklyn, Raymond V. Ingersoll, speaking on behalf of the Brehon T. Comervell, WPA Administrator. Ingersoll applauds the local aspects of the transmitter and the binding aspects of its location in Brooklyn.

Bands play.


Audio courtesy of the NYC Municipal Archives WNYC Collection


WNYC archives id: 43375
Municipal archives id: LT5937

Contributors:

Tommy Cowan, Raymond V. Ingersoll, Frederick Kracke, Fiorello H. La Guardia, Police Department Band and Sanitation Department Band

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About Miscellaneous

Programs ranging from the 1930s to the 1970s covering a variety of cultural and political topics.

From archival broadcasts of sewer plant openings to single surviving episodes of long-defunct series, "Miscellaneous" is a catch-all for the odds and ends transferred as part of the New York Public Radio Archives Department's massive NEH-funded digitization project, launched in 2010.

Buried in this show you will find all sorts of treasures, from the 1937 dedication of the WNYC Greenpoint transmitter to the 1939 lighting of the City Hall Christmas tree and the 1964 reception for Nobel Prize recipient Dr. Martin Luther King Jr

This collection includes some unique “slice-of-life” productions that provide a telling portrait of America from the 1940s through the 1950s, such as public service announcements regarding everything from water conservation to traffic safety and juvenile delinquency and radio dramas such as "The Trouble Makers" and "Hate, Incorporated."

 

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