Streams

Debating Native Advertising

Friday, October 18, 2013

James Del, Ad Director at Gawker Media, and Bob Garfield, co-host of On The Media, debate the merits and pitfalls of native advertising in a preview of their discussion of the topic tomorrow at WFMU's Radiovision festival.

Guests:

James Del and Bob Garfield

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Comments [11]

has anyone actually read gawker dot com lately? tain't news... or should I say, taint news.

Oct. 20 2013 06:04 PM

Gawker guy reminds me of my gastrolentilolologist. Just when I think I've presented a flawless argument, he reminds me that he is the doctor, then forces me to submit to something very unpleasant.

Also, I tell myself that my gastrolentilolologist is highly trained -- but when I ask him a question about some new relevant I just read about in the NYTimes, he inevitably whips out his tablet at $#% googles it!

Oct. 20 2013 08:55 AM
critical thinker from new york

As the waters become murkier between content and ads, readers and listeners have to become more astute with the burden of critical thought placed on the reader not the media. The adman from Gawker pointed out that younger audiences are aware of this and "click" more intentionally than those from a print oriented generation. The debate was provocative and informative. However, I wonder why traditional media proclaim their upholding of "standards" when we know that is fiction. Editorial content is slanted, and placement of the "big stories" is a well thought out strategy for increasing readership. I'm sure similar debates occurred when traditional media ran their first ads. It took time before readers became savvy enough to discern the difference. Over time, native ads will become part of our culture, and we will know how to "read" them.

Oct. 18 2013 11:30 AM
PJ From NJ from New Jersey

James from Gawker employed a tactic that is common with younger people who can't make their point; he simply called the person making the counter- point (Bob Garfield) old and out of touch. And before I'm accused of being old and out of touch too, I'm only in my 30s, and similar to James, grew up with the Internet.

I can spot a native ad, spam, etc., but that doesn't mean that everyone using the Internet is that savvy (if they were, Norton and McAfee wouldn't exist!!!)

This is clearly an ethically grey area, if James would admit that and THEN say that Gawker needs this money to sustain their journalistic practices, I would have more respect for his point of view (and would probably agree with him).

Oct. 18 2013 11:20 AM
gabyc from sao paulo brazil

so mr. gawker's point is basically, "we're not selling out, you just dont understand the internet.''

somehow I dont think letting corporate paid sponsors write your content is just a matter of generational perspective. if i did, i might think gawker was a source of ''great journalism"

Oct. 18 2013 11:14 AM

Ignoring the fact that Bob Garfield is a little bit full of hot air, couldn't we put somebody more substantial then the Gawker AD slut opposite him??

Oct. 18 2013 11:07 AM
Mr. Bad from NYC

I fell off my seat laughing when Del used the words "high quality journalism" in reference to Gawker. It is TMZ for the pretentious, nothing more and nothing less.

Oct. 18 2013 11:07 AM
Amy from Manhattan

1. The advertorials I've seen have had a line (not highly prominent, but not hidden either) at the top or the bottom saying "This is a paid advertisement." Is the "Sponsored content" label on native advertisements less noticeable than that?

2. What was actually being advertised in the glaciology native ad?

Oct. 18 2013 11:02 AM
Lena from Brooklyn

Anytime I click on an "article" and find out I've been tricked into reading native advertisement, I lose a little more respect for whatever site I've been reading. It is irritating.

Oct. 18 2013 11:01 AM
Robert from NYC

OK you can erase this and my previous post, I looked up Native Advertising and I got it. Sorry. I it suddenly occurred to me that we live in an internet world and everything one want to know is at one's fingertips, and so I let my fingers do the walking.

Oct. 18 2013 09:59 AM
Robert from NYC

Duh, what is native advertising?

Oct. 18 2013 09:54 AM

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