David Remnick and Ian Frazier on Joseph Mitchell

Joseph Mitchell started at The New Yorker in 1938, and was a staff writer for fifty-eight years, until his death in 1996. His journalism chronicled everyday life in New York Cityhe wrote about Mohawk steelworkers, fishermen, street-preachers, bartenders, ticket-takers, and bearded ladies. In the mid nineteen-sixties, he stopped publishing any work in the magazine. But apparently he never stopped writing. In this week's issue, there's a previously unpublished chapter from an unfinished memoir that he started in the late nineteen-sixties and early nineteen-seventies. Here, The New Yorker's editor David Remnick and staff writer Ian Frazier talk with Sasha Weiss about their memories of Mitchell, why he didn't publish for so many decades, and the influence his writing has had on them and on the magazine.