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Bill of Rights Day Ceremony

Wednesday, December 15, 1965

This episode is from the WNYC archives. It may contain language which is no longer politically or socially appropriate.

Presentation of awards by Bill of Rights Day Association. Mayor Wagner reads the proclamation.


Awards is given to Wagner (no really, Kennedy). He's not in attendance, and the children are sad. Philip Ryan reads his acceptance.


Warren Weaver receives an award for distinguished public service in the field of journalism.


Dr. Peter San Martino receives an award for work in education.


Edward S. Silver receives an award for law enforcement.


A fifth award is given to Vincent Rossini, the National Director of the Bill of Rights Association, for his work promoting the Bill of Rights.


A letter written by Senator Javits is read. Benediction.


Rundown: Program
In Recognition of the
174th Anniversary of the Ratification
of Our American
Bill of Rights
and
The 17th Anniversary of the Adoption of the
Universal Declaration of Human Rights
CITY HALL , NEW YORK
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 1965
12 NOON
Twentyfifth National Observance
Sponsored by
AMERICAN BILL OF RIGHTS DAY ASSOCIATION
CAPT. VINCENT ROSSINI
Founder and National Director


Order of Exercises
CHAIRMAN OF THE EXERCISES
HON. EDWARD D. RE
Chairman, Foreign Claims Settlement Commission
of the United States
THE STAR SPANGLED BANNER. Miss RINA TELLI
Dramatic Soprano, Star of Opera, Concert and TV
INVOCATION. RABBI EUGENE J. COHEN
National Jewish Welfare Board
READING FROM THE SCRIPTURES REV. EDMUND A. BOSCH
Chaplain, Police Department
PRESENTATION OF CITATIONS. HON. ROBERT F. WAGNER
Mayor of the City of New York, Presiding
RECIPIENTS:
DR . PETER SAMMARTINO
President, Fairleigb Dickinson University
Rutherford, N. J.
— In the Field of Education
MR. WARREN WEAVER
Journalist, N. Y. Times
— In the Field of Journalism
HON . EDWARD L. SILVER
Judge, Surrogate's Court of Kings County
—In the Field of Law
ACKNOWLEDGMENT
BENEDICTION H. E. MOST REV. JOSEPH M. PERNICONE
Auxiliary Bishop to Cardinal Spellman
AMERICA , OUR HERITAGE ARRANGED BY H. ADES
CARDINAL SPELLMAN HIGH SCHOOL CHORALE
Conducted by William Jacques
The Association wishes to acknowledge the cooperation of Bro. Gregory, F. S. C, Principal
of Boy's Department Cardinal Spellman High School
(The music for these exercises is by the Department of Sanitation Orchestra under the leadership of
Maestro JOHN M. CELEBRE, through the cooperation of HON. FRANK J. LUCIA, Commissioner.)
Bill of Rights
The Ten Original Amendments
ARTICLE I.
(Religious Establishment Prohibited. Freedom
of Speech, of the Press, and Right to Petition.)—•
Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment
of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise
thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech,
or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably
to assemble and to petition the Government
for a redress of grievances.
ARTICLE II.
(Right to Keep and Bear Arms.)— A well-regulated
militia being necessary to the security of a
free State, the right of the people to keep and
bear arms shall not be infringed.
ARTICLE III.
(Conditions for Quarters for Soldiers.) — No
soldier shall, in time of peace, be quartered in
any house without the consent of the owner, nor
in time of war but in a manner to be prescribed
by law.
ARTICLE IV.
(Right of Search and Seizure Regulated.)—The
right of the people to be secure in their persons,
houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable
searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and
no warrants shall issue but upon probable cause,
supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly
describing the place to be searched, and the persons
or things to be seized.
ARTICLE V.
(Provisions Concerning Prosecution, Trial and
Punishment—Private Property Not to Be Taken
for Public Use Without Compensation.)—No person
shall be held to answer for a capital or other
infamous crime unless on a presentment or indictment
of a Grand Jury, except in cases arising in
the land or naval forces, or in the militia, when
in actual service, in time of war or public danger;
nor shall any person be subject for the same
offense to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb;
nor shall be compelled in any criminal case to
be a witness against himself, nor be deprived of
life, liberty, or property, without due process of
law; nor shall private property be taken for public
use without just compensation.
ARTICLE VI.
(Right to Speedy Trial, Witnesses, etc.)—-In all
criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the
right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial
jury of the State and district wherein the crime
shall have been committed, which districts shall
have been previously ascertained by law, and to
be informed of the nature and cause of the
accusation; to be confronted with the witnesses
against him; to have compulsory process for obtaining
witnesses in his favor, and to have the
assistance of counsel for his defense.
ARTICLE VII.
(Right of Trial by Jury.)—In suits at common
law, where the value in controversy shall exceed
twenty dollars, the right of trial by jury shall be
preserved, and no fact tried by a jury shall be
otherwise re-examined in any court of the United
States than according to the rules of the common
law.
ARTICLE VIII.
(Excessive Bail or Fines and Cruel Punishment
Prohibited.)—Excessive bail shall not be required,
nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual
punishments inflicted.
ARTICLE IX.
(Rule of Construction of Constitution.) — The
enumeration in the Constitution of certain rights
shall not be construed to deny or disparage others
retained by the people.
ARTICLE X.
(Rights of States Under Constitution.) — The
powers not delegated to the United States by the
Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States,
are reserved to the States respectively, or to the
people.
"The Four Freedoms"
"In the future days, which we seek to make
secure, we look forward for a world founded
upon four essential human freedoms.
"The first is freedom of speech and expression—
everywhere in the world.
"The second is freedom of every person to worship
God in his own way—everywhere in the world.
"The third is freedom from want—which, translated
into world terms, means economic understandings
which will secure to every nation a
healthy, peaceful life for its inhabitants—everywhere
in the world.
"The fourth is freedom from fear — which,
translated into world terms, means a worldwide
reduction of armaments to such a point and in
such a thorough fashion that no nation will be
in a position to commit an act of aggression
against any neighbor—anywhere in the world."
Franklin Delano Roosevelt
Address to the Congress
January 6, 1941
State Governors
Who have issued proclamations or messages concerning
Bill of Rights Day Observances
Alabama, GOV. GEORGE P. WALLACE
Alaska, GOV. WILLIAM A. EGAN
Arizona, GOV. PAUL J. FANNIN
Arkansas, GOV. ORVAL E. FAUBUS
California, GOV. EDMUND G. BROWN
Colorado, GOV. JOHN A. LOVE
Connecticut, GOV. JOHN DEMPSEY
Delaware, GOV. CHARLES L. TERRY, JR.
Florida, GOV. FARRIS BRYANT
Georgia, GOV. CARL E. SANDERS
Hawaii, GOV. JOHN A. BURNS
Idaho, GOV. ROBERT E. SMYLIE
Illinois, GOV. OTTO KERNER, JR.
Indiana, GOV. MATTHEW E. WEISH
Iowa, GOV. HAROLD E. HUGHES
Kansas, GOV. JOHN ANDERSON
Kentucky, GOV. EDWARD T. BREATHITT
Louisiana, GOV. JAMES J. McKITHEN
Maine, GOV. JOHN H. REED
Maryland, GOV. J. MILLARD TAWES
Massachusetts, GOV. ENDICOT PERBODY
Michigan, GOV. GEORGE W. ROMNEY
Minnesota, GOV. KARL F. ROLVAGG
Missouri, GOV. WARREN E. HEARMES
Mississippi, GOV. PUL B: JOHNSON Jr.
Montana, GOV. TIM BABCOCK
Nebraska, GOV. FRANK B. MORRISON
Nevada, GOV. GRANT SAWYER
New Hampshire, GOV. JOHN W. KING
New Jersey, GOV. RICHARD J. HUGHES
New Mexico, GOV. JACK M. CAMPBELL
New York, GOV. NELSON A. ROCKEFELLER
North Carolina, GOV. TERRY SANFORD
North Dakota, GOV. WILLIAM L. GUY
Ohio, GOV. JAMES A. RHODES
Oklahoma, GOV. HENRY BELLMON
Oregon, GOV. MARK O. HATFIELD
Pennsylvania, GOV. WILLIAM A. SCRANTON
Rhode Island, GOV. JOHN H. CHAFEE
South Carolina, GOV. ROBERT E. McNAIR
South Dakota, GOV. ARCHIE GUBBEND
Tennessee, GOV. FRANK C. CLEMENT
Texas, GOV. JOHN B. CONNALLY
Utah, GOV. GEORGE D. CLYDE
Virginia, GOV. ALBERTIS S. HARRISON, Jr.
Vermont, GOV. PHILIP H. HOFF
Washington, GOV. ALBERT R. ROSELLINI
West Virginia, GOV. WILLIAM W. BARRON
Wisconsin, GOV. JOHN W. REYNOLDS
Wyoming, GOV. CLIFFORD F. HANSEN
The first national observance of the Bill of Rights Day, Proclaimed by
President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, was held on December 15th, 1941 in the City of New York
and has become an annual observance.
The proclamation of the Mayor of the City of New York, first capital of the United States,
where the Bill of Rights was accepted by the First Congress and submitted to the States for ratification,
was issued in behalf of the Association and signed by Mayor Robert F. Wagner on Dec. 1965.
AMERICAN BILL OF RIGHTS DAY ASSOCIATION
National Headquarters:
175 FIFTH AVENUE, NEW YORK CITY 10, N. Y.
National Director: Capt. VINCENT ROSSINI
Asst, National Director: JOHN TORZILLI
Educational Director: FREDERICK CUTTITTA
Public Relations: CARL W. GERACI
The Association Wishes to Acknowledge the Patronage of
THE COLUMBIA ASSOCIATION
O F THE BOARD OF EDUCATION
Program Published through courtesy of
Equitable Savings and Loan Association, 15 Willoughby St., Brooklyn, N. Y.


Audio courtesy of the NYC Municipal Archives WNYC Collection


WNYC archives id: 70604
Municipal archives id: T1492

Contributors:

Cardinal Spellman High School Chorus, Philip Ryan, Peter San Martino, Robert F. Wagner and Warren Weaver

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