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Bill de Blasio Appoints Bratton, Rejects "False Choice" Between Safety and Privacy

Thursday, December 05, 2013

Mayor-Elect Bill de Blasio has appointed former Giuliani NYPD commissioner Bill Bratton to once again lead New York's police department. In a statement, de Blasio said that "Bill Bratton is a proven crime-fighter" who rejects "the false choice between keeping New Yorkers safe and protecting their civil rights. This is an Administration that will do both." Bratton added that "Mayor-Elect de Blasio’s priorities are my priorities."

This comes in a week when de Blasio is announcing his first-term team, a set of advisers and commissioners who he says will help tackle his priority of reducing inequality in New York City. Today he is expected to announce Bill Bratton as NYPD Commissioner.

Meanwhile, President Obama gave a speech yesterday in which he warned of a "dangerous and growing inequality and lack of upward mobility" in the developed world. He also quoted Pope Francis: "How can it be that it is not a news item when an elderly homeless person dies of exposure, but it is news when the stock market loses two points?"

We discuss the Bratton pick, the inequality agenda in New York City, and beyond, with your calls and local analysis from Juan Manuel Benitez of NY1 Noticias and Jill Colvin of The Observer. Plus, live coverage of Bill de Blasio's latest transition announcement, scheduled for 10am.


Obama Speech on Economic Mobility and Inequality (Transcript)

Guests:

Juan Manuel Benitez and Jill Colvin

Comments [52]

NYC median rent: $3017mth ≠ "Living" Wage: pre tax (gross) $2400mth

Bad math.

Dec. 05 2013 11:44 AM
jgarbuz from Queens

To Peckstiff

Last word, "balance" will be restored as those countries that were held back under socialism and communism, or for other reasons, begin to catch up, and they will have to provide greater social security and wages to their populations, till a certain equilibrium point is reached (barring natural disasters or nuclear war). This is already starting to happen. Other "trade partners" like the EU, China, Japan and others are facing the same problems, and worse, regarding demographics. What we are going through is a transitional period, very difficult adjustment, but not disastrous. More people will be living vertically in hi rise apartments versus suburbia, and only the very wealthy will have the luxury of having land and a "suburban" lifestyle. It may take a few more decades, but barring wars and natural disasters, an equilibrium point will be reached. Cheap robots will be a large part of the "solution."

Dec. 05 2013 11:28 AM
jgarbuz from Queens

To Peckstiff

Last word, "balance" will be restored as those countries that were held back under socialism and communism, or for other reasons, begin to catch up, and they will have to provide greater social security and wages to their populations, till a certain equilibrium point is reached (barring natural disasters or nuclear war). This is already starting to happen. Other "trade partners" like the EU, China, Japan and others are facing the same problems, and worse, regarding demographics. What we are going through is a transitional period, very difficult adjustment, but not disastrous. More people will be living vertically in hi rise apartments versus suburbia, and only the very wealthy will have the luxury of having land and a "suburban" lifestyle. It may take a few more decades, but barring wars and natural disasters, an equilibrium point will be reached. Cheap robots will be a large part of the "solution."

Dec. 05 2013 11:27 AM
Edward from Washington Heights AKA pretenious Hudson Heights

Stop outsourcing.

Bring jobs back to the US.

Dec. 05 2013 11:22 AM
Peckstiff

J, I never used the word, "equality". I'm looking for balance. We've lost it, and things like war, slaves and communism will not be back ti fix it... I hope. A middle class may be rare, but that's what has made the US so unique and great. I hope that we adjust to technology - educate more engineers, programers, etc. but that's high skilled work. There must be something else, a leisure economy (arts/sports), elder healthcare, education, service economies, etc. It's a painful transition to a post-digital world, and the rich must be part of it. Govt must play a bigger role for now, because clearly the CEOs will not, and that means more taxes, like it or not.

Dec. 05 2013 11:17 AM
Scott

Will one of the producers please try and find a guest with real world business experience to join this type conversation. You are doing everyone a disservice by not explaining the consequences of mandating wage increases on private business.

One example:

If the minimum wage at restaurants is raised to $15.00 an hour it will result in lower employment and the lowest skilled workers will be pushed out for better qualified workers. We will then be left with even more people on unemployment and government assistance.

Dec. 05 2013 11:11 AM

Statistically, minimum wage has hovered around about half of the 'average' wage. To my mind, no one who works a full time job, should earn less than the per capita share of income GDP. [One half of GDP divided by the population]. That formula yields a min wage of about $11.50.

In today's economy, a worker needs to earn $59,965 in order to have the same proportionate buying power of a minimum wage worker in 1963.

Dec. 05 2013 11:07 AM
jgarbuz from Queens

To Peckstiff

"So we agree Jgar, but then what? It's more than just the fluidity of capital because of the digital revolution. Computerization has replaced so many of the middle class jobs."

Okay, first of all let's forget about "equality" because that doesn't exist in nature. Second, the concept of "middle class" is fluid, ephemeral and rare in history. When nations won wars and brought home slaves and tribute, there was a temporary rise in the income of a larger number from the masses. When we came out of WWII as the only intact economy, we got 30 years of "middle class" life for many, but only until the other "trade partners" got back on their feet. And then we liberated 3 billion workers from communism and made them capitalist competitors.

But what has raised the average life expectancy, given us greater entertainment and freedom has been technology. There will be more robots that most people will be able to afford, like with cars, and even the "poor" will have much more. But the envy between those who live in small apartments, and those who live in mansions will continue. Equality is a myth that does not exist in real life, i.e, nature itself. Robots will do more of what we used to call work. New kind of jobs still undreamed of will come into existence, I assure you.

Dec. 05 2013 10:57 AM
Peckstiff

Thanks, Ed. We've been waiting for your simple, single-mindedness. But, you're wrong. The facts do not back up your statement. There are waaaaaay more young people in most countries than ever. Sorry, but thanks for playing.

Dec. 05 2013 10:53 AM
Edward from Washington Heights AKA pretenious Hudson Heights

School should not be a Baby Sitting service.

School is a place for students to learn skills to become productive adults.

What happens to kids whose parents work after 3PM?

Dec. 05 2013 10:53 AM

There's no reason to cover the mayor live. Just play the tape at the top of the hour.

Dec. 05 2013 10:51 AM
Ed from Larchmont

The problem of our time is not income disparity: that is a symptom. The problem of our time is abortion, the lack of young people is disordering the economy. And since the mayor is rabidly pro-abortion, nothing will improve in any area.

Dec. 05 2013 10:50 AM
Peckstiff

So we agree Jgar, but then what?

It's more than just the fluidity of capital because of the digital revolution. Computerization has replaced so many of the middle class jobs. We no longer need employees to execute the usual "good" jobs, and we're left with a world of CEOs vs. burger flippers. Everyone can flip, but not everyone can be a CEO, so the vast majority of the employee pool become losers. How do we rebalance the workforce for a digital world?

Dec. 05 2013 10:48 AM
Leslie Tucker from East Village, NYC

Pre-K is not only about educating little kids, but also it directly benefits working parents. In order for parents to even have jobs in NYC, there needs to be some sort of day care system, similar to other countries. General Pre-K will help out with this need.

Dec. 05 2013 10:45 AM
Jim

"How the pyramid works" = "There will always be at least two layers of indirection between me and any scandal".

Shows up late. Talks too much (mostly about himself). Not a good start.

Dec. 05 2013 10:44 AM
Edward from Washington Heights AKA pretenious Hudson Heights

Why stop with Pre-K?

How about Pre-Pre-Pre-K?

Schools provide breakfast and lunch for some kids.

How about McDonald's and Burger King provide breakfast for kids?

Dec. 05 2013 10:42 AM
jgarbuz from Queens

To Peckstiff

"It's globalization. Which I am all for. But when coporations can move around the world, but workers are tied to one location, the balance got out of whack."

That is EXACTLY correct, and what I have argued here many times. Capital is elastic; labor is inelastic. Capital can fly at the speed of light anywhere returns are highest; labor is mostly stuck in place. But globalization is not new. It happened many times even in ancient history. Whenever trade flourished, an elite always got much richer compared to the masses stuck on the land. And this always caused resentment between the haves and have nots. History is replete with examples.

Dec. 05 2013 10:40 AM
jc

Shorris and Bratton? Plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose. As for the minimum wage - my immigrant parents worked in the garment industry and were paid middle class wages that enough for them to have food, a home and a car. If the only jobs left for most people are in industries like fast food then we need to get used to paying them enough for a decent standard of living.

Dec. 05 2013 10:40 AM
SKV from NYC

Can you give it a rest with the unceasing snark about the press conference starting late?

Dec. 05 2013 10:40 AM
FlFamilyMan from Florida

The minimum wage is just another way to dumb down america. To guarantee workers a living wage without any requirements from the workers would remove any incentive to improve their skill sets and provide innovation to this economy. Anyone in today's economy that expects a good paying job with just a High School degree or less is unrealistic, crazy, and a leach on soceity.
A better way would be to require business to give the workers a portion of its profit. That would motivate both the workers and business to innovate and improve their business thus the economy. A lot of companies have profit sharing but these are at their discretion and unfair.

Dec. 05 2013 10:39 AM
RLF from Yonkers

A few too many DINOs popping into the Deblasio addmin. Clintonian fakes, Cuomo fakes, Giulianni fakes.

Dec. 05 2013 10:38 AM
Robert from NYC

Did that guy really say "CPT"? I hope it doesn't mean what it used to mean.

Dec. 05 2013 10:34 AM
Cis G from Brooklyn

NPR should buy/start a fast food restaurant chain, pay workers 15 dollars an hour or more and support any shortfalls via pledge drives.

Dec. 05 2013 10:34 AM
Dee from NJ

I agree with last collar. Many jobs in the future will also be done by machines. Illegal aliens have taken over certain sectors such as construction and yard work, that used to be good entry level jobs, but are now done for less.

Dec. 05 2013 10:34 AM

All businesses, not just those mainly paying minimum wage, will be opposed to a large increase in minimum wage because workers currently making more than minimum wage will want more. If raised to around $15, those now making $12, 15, 18, 20, 25, etc. will want more compared to a new benchmark of $15.

But defending wage levels that can't support people makes no sense.

Dec. 05 2013 10:32 AM
Peckstiff

When and how did this divide begin??

It's globalization. Which I am all for. But when coporations can move around the world, but workers are tied to one location, the balance got out of whack.

Taxing more and raising wages are both bad ideas to somebody, but lowering prices is not in reality. Yet, there must be an answer, and it's probably some mushy combination of every possible solution that no one likes completely.

Face it, there Are greedy CEOs, but not all of them are. And, there are people we all know who really should NOT be in the workforce. They will just annoy those of us who are. Some people are just whacko's and should be home and out of our way - give them some financial assistance and a place to live, and move on. The hard part is identifying them from the just plain lazy folks.

There needs to be a recalibration for this flat world, and it will probably be slow and muddy, so get used to it.

Dec. 05 2013 10:30 AM
john from office

Why is Brian saying Juan like a spanish speaker?? Are we speaking in spanish?? How would he pronounce SAN JUAN or CALIFORNIA or ARIZONA. A bit too PC today.

Dec. 05 2013 10:28 AM
Al from Marine Park

The problem with reducing inequality is that the wealthy are naturally reluctant to reduce their incomes, Those that are business owners or executives will either raise prices, lay off workers, and/or switch to overseas workers in order to at least maintain their incomes. In some cases they may go out of business. Instead of simply raising taxes on the wealthy, perhaps there could be some incentive-based way of raising money from them such as a high-stakes lottery.

Dec. 05 2013 10:28 AM
john from office

The DeBlasio World seems to exist on CPT, cannot be on time for anything.

Dec. 05 2013 10:24 AM
MichaelB from Morningside Heights

Oh, if Uncle Al Sharpton -- that unselfish paragon of integrity and fair play -- is alright with the appointment of Bratton as Police Commissioner, then it MUST be OK.

(p.s. I think Bratton is a great choice.)

Dec. 05 2013 10:24 AM
Mr. Bad from NYC

I'm all for these programs (except for the pointless after school and childhood education programs as they're simply a union handout)but what we need more than anything is reform of the tax code. People who work for a living and are still below or near poverty level shouldn't be paying any taxes, be they state, local or federal, payroll etc., at all. They are contributing what is essentially slave labor to the economy and they should not have to pay for the privilege. If the IRS was freed up to pursue the REST of the tax dodgers (corps. at the top) I think we'd have a lot more revenue, lower taxes overall, and a booming consumer economy.

Dec. 05 2013 10:24 AM
Robert from NYC

But there are no other jobs! Unfortunately MacDonald's has become one of the many fast food employers that workers of jobs sent overseas can go to. Fine, MacDonald's should be a starting job. And should the CEO be making as much as s/he does? If you just halve the salary of some of these CEOs (which would still be very high pay) not only could workers get paid more but so too the "precious" stock holders could receive better dividends as well. Seems more people are concerned about stock holders options more that the employees pay.

Dec. 05 2013 10:23 AM

McDonalds operates successfully and profitably in France, where the minimum wage is €9.43/hour, the equivalent of $12.88. It is indexed automatically each year

Dec. 05 2013 10:20 AM
Jay F.

Government subsidy is another term for Tax Payers footing the bill. When does it stop?

Dec. 05 2013 10:20 AM

@caller David...amen brother.

Dec. 05 2013 10:20 AM
Katie from Huntington

I heard an interview this morning with a woman who had been working in the fast food industry FOR TEN YEARS, and she was still making only minimum wage. That is a crime. Surely the company should be obliged to give her an annual increase above minimum wage. Isn't that what we all expect?

Dec. 05 2013 10:19 AM
Barb from town

"Kumbaya moment" Brian, really? Economic justice is "kumbaya"?!

Why on Earth would you patronize or minimize the efforts of people working for wages that are insufficient to live on to make a living wage?

I'm a big fan of yours, but that was just gross of you, Brian.

Dec. 05 2013 10:18 AM
RLF from Yonkers

Small business will be hurt because they are carrying the large corps., like the NYSE, who get tax subsidies in the name of 'economic development'. The unequal treatment of large and small corps under the law has to be addressed at the national level otherwise there is a march to the bottom by competing states.

Dec. 05 2013 10:18 AM

@caller David...amen brother.

Dec. 05 2013 10:18 AM
Fishmael from NYC

"Living Wage" of $15/hour, at 40 hour weeks, = $31,000 per year (gross, before deductions for taxes, health insurance *if* it's offered...)

Just for some context on what we're talking about as "living". Esp. for those workers with families. In NYC.

Perhaps this living wage rate might be indexed to average housing costs where the person lives?

Dec. 05 2013 10:15 AM
Katie from Huntington

Raise the minimum wage, tax the richest among us (who can well afford it) and put the money in the hands of those who need it the most, and who will definitely spend it--this will be more of a boost to the economy than stupid trickle down, which, by the time it trickles down, has nothing left.

Dec. 05 2013 10:14 AM
Dee from NJ

Trickle down economics turned out to be trickle up poverty. This started with Walmart, which put mom and pops out of business and has given large corporations the run of the country. If you want the country to function, the middle class has to thrive. While corporate profits are insane they are not passing these on to the workers. If something isn't done to protect the middle class, we will be reduced to living in gated communities of haves and have nots. An oligarchy is what we're headed toward.

Dec. 05 2013 10:12 AM
Lamar from Harlem

I do not support paying fast food workers $15 and hour. Working in fast food is not a career. It is a job. I think they should give them benefits not $15 an hour to flip a burger!

Dec. 05 2013 10:11 AM
Clif

Estelle from Brooklyn, while I agree with your sentiment about unionized labor, I think it's an outdated model. Worker Cooperatives seem like a much more viable alternative to the traditional corporate model.

Dec. 05 2013 10:11 AM
antonio from baySide

Yes to all. Finally some sanity! I love how the oligarchs make the 99% feel bad for the scraps which we deserve relative to their wages.

Firefighters, teachers, sanitation workers should get more then an average financial paper pushers!

Dec. 05 2013 10:09 AM
Sal from Suffolk

Why can't the prices of housing and essentials go down. This would solve the problem of raising the wages.

Dec. 05 2013 10:09 AM
Sheldon from Brooklyn

Punitively "punishing" the rich, is not an answer - capitalism is not a zero sum game.

However, the wealthy HAVE NOT PAID THEIR FAIR SHARE, for over 30 years. They have been under-taxed, and in some cases - not taxed at all.

No civilized society society can function without an educated, skilled and secure - working and middle-class.

Dec. 05 2013 10:08 AM
Estelle from Brooklyn

We need strong unions to provide a balance. Without unions, it's individuals versus big companies.

Dec. 05 2013 10:08 AM
Clif

Everyone who is willing to work deserves to have a "liveable" wage (not sure I agree with the actuall Living Wage bill yet). People shouldn't have to have multiple jobs just to survive.

Dec. 05 2013 10:07 AM
Peckstiff from Bowery

Great clip from the President. You can't be a capitialist any longer and say what is changing in this country is a good thing. Eventually, when the middle clase become just a segment of the poor, it will bring down even the rich. All the money in the world will not feel right in your pocket when everyone else is looking for answers, because they will have no place to look but to the govt, and the rich reeeeeallly hate that.

Dec. 05 2013 10:06 AM
Robert from NYC

Yes, finally I heard the president us the word poverty. What's wrong with him?

Dec. 05 2013 10:01 AM
Nick from UWS

I am a Jew, but I love this Pope. I think he is a terrific guy. Terrific.

Dec. 05 2013 09:41 AM

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