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Art Inspired by Modernist Buildings and Unfinished Houses

Sunday, May 04, 2014

Livia Corona, 47,547 Homes for Mexico Ixtapaluca, 2007 (Courtesy of the artist and Galeria Agustina Ferreyra, San Juan, Puerto Rico)

A new art exhibit at the Bronx Museum looks at how modernist architecture changed Latin America.

Beyond the Supersquare features over 30 artists with about 60 pieces, including sculptures, photography, video and installations. The pieces reflect on several buildings constructed from 1920 through the 1960s in the region, when prominent architects like Brazilian Oscar Niemeyer used his curvy buildings and swirling forms to transform entire cities like Brasilia. 

Jordi Colomer, an artist from Barcelona, Spain, with a video work in the exhibit said most people think the city is so big that there is no end to it, so he decided to investigate.

"Going by through helicopter, we found this neighborhood which is called Ixtapaluca and you can see really that there is a line where the city ends and there is nothing after that street," he said. "So you can say this is the last street of the city."

Another work is Colombian Felipe Arturo's miniature of the Domino House, an open floor plan structure designed by noted Swiss-French architect Le Corbusier. 

Arturo's version is unfinished, he said, because it represents thousands of houses in Bogota.

Felipe Arturo, Casa Domino, 2010 (Courtesy of the artist)

The exhibit will be on view until January of next year. Admission to The Bronx Museum is free.

A new art exhibit looks at how modernist architecture changed Latin America.
The show is at the Bronx Museum and it features over 30 artists, including Jordi Colomer [JOHR-jee coh-lor-MER], who is from Barcelona, Spain.
His video-piece portrays a neighborhood in Mexico City with standard houses, situated on the very edge of the city. He says most people think the city is so big that there is no end to it, so he decided to investigat

A new art exhibit looks at how modernist architecture changed Latin America.

The show at the Bronx Museum is entitled Beyod the Supersqare and and it features over 30 artists, and more than 60 pieces, including sculptures, photography, video and installations.

Jordi Colomer, and artist from Barcelona, Spain, has a video-piece in the exhibit that portrays a neighborhood in Mexico City with standard houses, situated on the very edge of the city. He said most people think the city is so big that there is no end to it, so he decided to investigate.

"Going by through helicopter, we found this neighborhood which is called Ixtapaluca and you can see really that there is a line, in where the city ends and there is nothing after that street," he said. "So you can say this is the last street of the city."

Felipe Arturo, an artist from Colombia, has a sculpture in the show that is a miniature of the Domino House. The house is an open floor plan structure designed by noted Swiss-French architect Le Corbusier.

But Arturo explained his version is unfinished because it represents thousands of houses in Bogota.

"Families grow in numbers and grow in floors. But then the model in which this is based, the technique is based in modernism, so it's like the incomplete utopia that is completed, you know, spontaneously," he said.

The exhibit will be on view until January of next year. Admission to The Bronx Museum is free.

 

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