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"The Armory Show at 100"

Wednesday, November 27, 2013

Curator Marilyn Kushner and exhibition historian and catalog editor/contributor Casey Blake, talk about “The Armory Show at 100: Modern Art and Revolution,” on view at the New-York Historical Society through February 23, 2014. The exhibition celebrates the centennial year of the legendary 1913 Armory Show, one of the most important art events and a turning point in American art, and brings together 100 masterworks from the show, including iconic pieces by Marcel Duchamp, Henri Matisse, Francis Picabia, Constantin Brancusi, Pablo Picasso and John Marin, and others.

Marsden Hartley (American, 1877-1943), Still Life, No. 1, 1912.

Oil on canvas, 31 ½ x 25 5/8 in. Columbus Museum of Art, Ohio: Gift of Ferdinand Howald, 1931.184.

From “The Armory Show at 100: Modern Art and Revolution,” on view at the New-York Historical Society through February 23, 2014.

Vincent van Gogh (Dutch, 1853-1890), Mountains at Saint Rémy (Montagnes à Saint-Rémy), 1889.

Oil on canvas, 28 ¼ x 35 ¾ in. Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Thannhauser Collection, Justin K. Thannhauser, 1978, 78.2514.24

From “The Armory Show at 100: Modern Art and Revolution,” on view at the New-York Historical Society through February 23, 2014.

Courtesy of the National Gallery of Art, Washington
Paul Gauguin (French, 1848-1903), Parau na te Varua ino (Words of the Devil), 1892.

Oil on canvas, 36 1/8 x 26 15/16 in. National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of the W. Averell Harriman Foundation in memory of Marie N. Harriman.

From “The Armory Show at 100: Modern Art and Revolution,” on view at the New-York Historical Society through February 23, 2014.

© 2013 Succession H. Matisse / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photography by Mitro Hood.
Henri Matisse (French, 1869-1954), Blue Nude, 1907.

Oil on canvas, 36 ¼ x 55 ¼ in. The Baltimore Museum of Art: The Cone Collection, formed by Dr. Claribel Cone and Miss Etta Cone of Baltimore, Maryland, BMA 1950.228.

From “The Armory Show at 100: Modern Art and Revolution,” on view at the New-York Historical Society through February 23, 2014.

© 2013 Delaware Art Museum / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
John Sloan (American, 1871-1951), Sunday, Women Drying Their Hair, 1912.

Oil on canvas, 26 1/8 x 32 1/8 in. Addison Gallery of American Art, Phillips Academy, Andover, Massachusetts, Museum Purchase, 1938.67.

From “The Armory Show at 100: Modern Art and Revolution,” on view at the New-York Historical Society through February 23, 2014.

© 2013 Estate of John Marin / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.
John Marin (American, 1870-1953), Woolworth Building, No. 28, 1912.

Watercolor over graphite, 18 ½ x 15 9/16 in. National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of Eugene and Agnes E. Meyer.

From “The Armory Show at 100: Modern Art and Revolution,” on view at the New-York Historical Society through February 23, 2014.

Photo, Richard Greenly Photography
Augustus E. John (Welsh-British, 1878–1961), The Way Down to the Sea, 1909–11.

Oil on canvas, 29⅞ × 26⅜ in. (76 × 67 cm). Private collection.

Pierre-Auguste Renoir (French, 1841-1919), Algerian Girl, 1881.

Oil on canvas, 20 x 16 in. Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Juliana Cheney Edwards Collection, 39.677

From “The Armory Show at 100: Modern Art and Revolution,” on view at the New-York Historical Society through February 23, 2014.

Honoré Daumier (French, 1808–1879), Third Class Carriage (Un Wagon de Troisième Classe), 1856–58.

Oil on panel, 10¼ × 13⅜ in. (26 × 33.9 cm). Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, Museum purchase, Whitney Warren, Jr. Bequest Fund in memory of Mrs. Adolph B. Spreckels, Bequest funds of Henry S. Williams in memory of H. K. S. Williams, Magnin Income Fund, Art Trust Fund, Alexander and Jean de Bretteville Fund, Art Acquisition Endowment Income Fund in honor of Mrs. John N. Rosekrans, 1996.51

From “The Armory Show at 100: Modern Art and Revolution,” on view at the New-York Historical Society through February 23, 2014.

© 2013 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris / Succession Marcel Duchamp
Marcel Duchamp (French, 1887-1968), Nude Descending a Staircase (No. 2), 1912.

Oil on canvas, 57 7/8 x 35 1/8 in. Philadelphia Museum of Art, The Louise and Walter Arensberg Collection, 1950, 1950-134-59.

From “The Armory Show at 100: Modern Art and Revolution,” on view at the New-York Historical Society through February 23, 2014.

Smithsonian Institution
Overhead view of Armory installation, 1913. Walt Kuhn, Kuhn family papers, and Armory Show records, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution

From “The Armory Show at 100: Modern Art and Revolution,” on view at the New-York Historical Society through February 23, 2014.

Guests:

Casey Blake and Marilyn Kushner
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Comments [1]

art525 from Park Slope

The curators didn't satisfactorily answer Leonard's question about Henri's name and it's an interesting story. Henri's reall name was Robert Henry Cozad. There is a town in Nebraska named Cozad after the family. Henri's father killed someone- I have heard two different versions of what motivated it. One was that he was a farmewr and cattlemen continually hearded their cattle over his land ruining his crops and the other was that the father was a gambler and killed a man in a dispute over gambling. Whatever the case the family hightailed it out of Nebraska and landed in Atlantic City. The children's names were changed as aliases. The father was a francophile and gave Robert the name Henri but Henri wanted to distance himself from all things French and declare himself completely American which of course was the motivation for the subject matter that got him and his group labeled the Ashcan School. I think it is a great story and it's too bad that curators didn't share that.

Dec. 06 2013 02:46 PM

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