Streams

Global English: Made in New York

Monday, October 25, 2010

Leslie Dunton-Downer, author The English is Coming!: How One Language is Sweeping the World, joins us again to explore some of the words and phrases from other languages picked up by the world's current lingua franca.

We want your suggestions! Nominate a word from another language that should be a part of "global English" here.

Guests:

Leslie Dunton-Downer

Comments [9]

Brian Barker from London England

I think that the choice of a future World Language is between English and Esperanto.

English must be opposed on grounds of "linguistic imperialism"

Interestingly the website http://www.lernu.net for example is enjoying 120,000 hits per month. That is certainly good :)

Nov. 07 2010 09:29 AM
Amalene from NJ

I forgot to add to my previous comment something which really bugs me and that is how many people spell 'definitley' like definately. This is especially true when people use the word when text messaging or on social media sites such as Facebook. I know there are other words that are victims of incorrect spelling too but that's the one that I find most annoying.
Yet another possible topic for discussion on the show.

Oct. 25 2010 01:12 PM
Amalene from NJ

I know this is off the subject but I wanted to know what Leslie Dunton-Downer thought of ending sentences with a preposition? Perhaps this could be a topic for another show.

Oct. 25 2010 01:00 PM
Sonni from New Jersey

My first language was German, which I no longer speak because my german mother thought it impolite to speak in front of those who did not understand the language. So my german is that of a six year old. I also don't think German is a very nice language, in that you leave more spit than content when you speak it.
But German has three words I love when people use them, that do not exist in English, but are occasionally heard.
Doppleganger
Wanderlust
and finally Zeitgeist.
Funny thing when ever I use Zeitgeist my Finnish speaking husband gets really bent out of shape.

Oct. 25 2010 12:37 PM
Paul from White Plains

Not a big point, but your guest noted the shortening of "taximeter" to "taxi." She left out the "cab." My understanding is that it was a shortening of "taximeter cabriolet."

As for words from other languages, half of English words are already borrowings. One of my favorites, however, that we still need is the German word, "gemutlich(keit)" - warmth, comfortableness, and more...

Oct. 25 2010 12:07 PM
Jon from Brooklyn

Brian, I can feel the flop-sweat oozing through my radio during your pledge pitches...tone it down...and let Leonard do some heavy-lifting for a change. Of all your hosts, he continually gets a free pass when it comes to "shilling for shekels".

Oct. 25 2010 12:02 PM
Jon from Brooklyn

Brian, I can feel the flop-sweat oozing through my radio during your pledge pitches...tone it down...and let Leonard do some heavy-lifting for a change. Of all your hosts, he continually gets a free pass when it comes to "shilling for shekels".

Oct. 25 2010 12:01 PM
Dave from Mexico

nada - In spanish mean nothing, without, or no.

Oct. 25 2010 12:01 PM
Charles M

A common pronoun for he and she could be lola ... as we already know this term from the famous Kinks song, which is also the spanish he and she put together!

Oct. 25 2010 12:00 PM

Leave a Comment

Email addresses are required but never displayed.

Get the WNYC Morning Brief in your inbox.
We'll send you our top 5 stories every day, plus breaking news and weather.