Streams

Open Phones: Your Fox-Cablevision Blackout Solutions

Monday, October 18, 2010

Fox and Cablevision are fighting over retransmission rights causing subscribers to miss Fox programming including local sports games. Brian Stelter, media reporter for the New York Times, explains why Fox and Cablevision are fighting, why you can't watch programming that you pay for, and how to watch Fox programming in the meantime. 

Listeners: Call us up and tell us how you've been watching Fox during this dispute. What are your Fox-Cablevision blackout solutions?

Guests:

Brian Stelter
News, weather, Radiolab, Brian Lehrer and more.
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Comments [27]

Jonathan Meckler from Brooklyn

There ought to be a Federal law that not only mandates both sides of the dispute must accept binding arbitration, but the affected channels remain on during the negotiations.

Oct. 18 2010 06:54 PM

>>I was greeted with a message telling me that until further notice, I would not be able to watch any Fox programs on Hulu.

WHAT???

Sounds like a case for the Brooklyn D.A. Or the FCC.

Oct. 18 2010 03:16 PM
Maya from Brooklyn

To add to what Paul said about Hulu, I tried to watch Glee on Hulu the other day. Unfortunately, Cablevision provides my internet, and I was greeted with a message telling me that until further notice, I would not be able to watch any Fox programs on Hulu.

Oct. 18 2010 03:11 PM
Lynn from white plains

To find Fox shows, I tried the "project free tv" site suggested by a caller. My McAfee security checker stopped me with its rating: "Found potential security risks. Use with extreme caution".

Oct. 18 2010 12:44 PM
Mike C. from Tribeca

Regarding Kathy's remarks about Ticketmaster's monopoly on concert tickets, that's just one reason tickets for Bob Dylan's current tour are sold only on the day of the show. Practically eliminates scalping too. Last year, the average Dylan ticket price was $120; this year the price is $60. More major artists should think about doing this.

Oct. 18 2010 12:09 PM
Brian from NJ

Back in the mid 90s I was at Lehigh University in Bethlehem PA. That area, as an experiment I assume, had two cable companies competing in the same market. The packages, programming, service, and of course cost were amazing. T is
time for real deregulation of the cable
companies. That BS telecom bill a decade ago did nothing

Oct. 18 2010 12:00 PM
aerialalan from L.I.

You can go watch FREE television by using an antenna and point it toward NYC. The real problem is that Major League Baseball has put the ALCS on a non broadcast channel. The NFL, for now, mandates the hometeam be on broadcast television. It's all about short term money.

Oct. 18 2010 11:58 AM
sunphat from Retro future

Fyi, the HD signal broadcast over the air is actually of better quality than what is delivered over cable.

Oct. 18 2010 11:57 AM
Eponymous from Williamsburg

I have NEVER payed for cable. My wife and I watch the ten free channels that come over the air and we rely on Hulu and NetFlix for the rest.

Oct. 18 2010 11:56 AM
jm

Over the air digital signals can be problematic when surrounded by many buildings, so not everyone can just use rabbit ears.

Oct. 18 2010 11:56 AM

Remember that Cablevision is the same company who made their customers wait a couple of YEARS before they could see the Yankees on the YES Channel. This is typical with Cablevision, and their customer service is the worst. I wish to H I was not forced to use them strictly because of my address.

Oct. 18 2010 11:55 AM
Ben from Manhattan

In fact, most fox show are not available until 8 days after the initial broadcast. This makes it almost impossible to use legal means to watch fox shows.

Oct. 18 2010 11:55 AM
Paul

Your guest mentioned that House would be available on Hulu the next day. Unfortunately, House is only available 8 days after the original air date on both Hulu and their own streaming site.

Oct. 18 2010 11:55 AM
Joe from Manhattan

My 21st century hack? Rabbit ears. And yes, it is in HD.

Oct. 18 2010 11:54 AM
Anon

tip: www.justin.tv

Oct. 18 2010 11:52 AM
Gino from Way Downtown

When Fox when out I was forced to get to know one of my neighbors. I heard the game on at his house and I just knocked on the door. Turned out to be a really cool Persian guy, so...wasn't all that bad.

Oct. 18 2010 11:51 AM
Robert from NYC

There are really only three reasons for watching FOX, The Simpsons, Family Guy, and The Cleveland Show. Fortunately I don't have Cablevision. Unfortunately I have Time Warner.

Oct. 18 2010 11:50 AM
Don from Smithtown

Is there some law against building a cable box with an antennae and programming the box to get the use the transmission channels over the air, obviating the need for retransmission fees altogether?

Oct. 18 2010 11:50 AM
stuart

Last winter, Scripps removed both HGTV and the Food Network from Cablevision for 3 weeks, which irked my wife during those long winter weekends. However, Cablevision refused to issue a refund for the missing programming, which irked my wife even more.

Oct. 18 2010 11:47 AM
Mike C. from Tribeca

There's already an alternative to watching the Yanks on television. It's called radio.

Oct. 18 2010 11:44 AM

Cable is astonishingly high.

So:

I'm in the VIllage, & have an antenna by my North-facing window. I get the 2-13 basics plus Ch. 31 OTA (over the air) --for free.

For my movie jones, I have the astoundingly wonderful Netflix for $9/mo.

The entire library of movie history, and tons of tv series, right in front of me, either on computer or with AppleTV, GoogleTV, a modern Blu-ray player or Roku. From "Birth of a Nation" to Chaplin to Gable to 2009 movies, as well as the classic David Tennant "Doctor Who" series, I have all that I have time to watch, and more--for $9/mo.

'bye, cable.

PS: Here's what I miss: Jon Stewart, Bill Maher, Classic Arts Showcase, TV1 and BookTV, but much can be seen online, tho it's a bit of a hassle. And how much of all that do I have time for anyway? I've a few other things to do than watch TV.

Oct. 18 2010 11:43 AM
Brian from NJ

I hope we get some background on this. Fox and the other major networks have always been free with the use of an antenna. Then the Feds mandated a switch to digital broadcast. Why is Cablevision charging us for broadcast tv? It is likestealig free air and then charging us to breathe. Cablevision simply broadcasts what is already free if you have one of te new digital converter boxes that the Feds subsidized a while back. So of course now Fox looks at this scam a says it wants some of that money. They are nth crooks in my mind. Can I as a cablevision subscriber go buy a digital box of myown so that this never happens to me and opt out of paying for broadcast tv as part of my
cable bill?

Oct. 18 2010 11:41 AM
chris from brooklyn

This doesn't affect Fox News, that is a separate channel. What I want to know is what would happen if this affected the Yankees series...

Oct. 18 2010 11:34 AM
Steve from NYC

The entire Yankees-Texas series is scheduled to be on TBS, not FOX. Shouldn't be an issue to watch the Yankees

Oct. 18 2010 11:04 AM
Joel from Nyack, NY

I am a believer in free speech but I do take a certain delight in the Fox blackout on Cablevision. We have a, probably, short reprieve from the fear mongering, untruths, and strange comedy of Fox. Let's enjoy a bit of silence while it lasts.

Oct. 18 2010 10:53 AM
Mike C. from Tribeca

Where's the negative in not getting Fox on cable? I wish Time-Warner had the guts to do that.

Being Rupert Murdoch means never having to say you're sorry.

Oct. 18 2010 10:49 AM
MW

Fox is off and suddenly Paladino goes down in the polls. Fox News people forced to change the channel and see real news!

Why is this even such big news? Who cares if they can't watch TV? TV is dead.

Oct. 18 2010 10:09 AM

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