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Guerilla Artists Stage MoMA Invasion

Friday, October 15, 2010

There's an exhibit of secret art on view now at the Museum of Modern Art, thanks to a group of guerilla artists from around the world.

They didn't get permission from the MoMA to install their art. Mark Skwarek, one of the organizers of the show, says he wasn't sure how the museum would react. "Actually MoMA tweeted about our exhibition, they basically welcomed us, so it was very positive," says Skwarek. "I think the Museum was receptive."

Swarek says that in the future there will be no separation of the virtual and the real. "This is real. We're on the edge of this field," he says.

Artist Tamiko Thiel, who has contributed two works to the exhibit, says the invasion of MoMA is a first. "I think this will go down in art history," she says.

You'll have to go to the MoMA with a smartphone to see the invisible installation, which includes a virtual take on the Berlin Wall. When you get there, here's how to view the virtual art:

Required Smartphone: iPhone 3GS/4 or Android device

Required App: Layar augmented reality browser

1. Start the Layar application and open the 'AR exhibition' layar. Do so by searching for keywords like: 'ar', 'art', 'MoMA' etc.

2. Your mobile phone now turns into an Augmented Reality viewer. Study the compass on the screen, and point your mobile phone in the direction of the white dots. These indicate the location/direction of the artworks.

3. Click on the 'filter' icon and then on 'CHOOSE FLOOR'. You will see all works on one floor at the time.

If you can't make it to MoMA, or don't have the required technology, check out this video for a virtual show:

Tamiko Thiel's work "Art Critic Matrix" from mark skwarek on Vimeo.

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