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Jules Feiffer Celebrates WNYC

History Notes: Volume 1, Issue 5

Friday, December 03, 2010 - 01:01 AM

From The Collection

 The cover of the June, 1997 WNYC Program Guide by Jules Feiffer. (WNYC Archive Collections)

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Broadcast on WNYC today in:

1929: "The Nature Trails at Bear Mountain," a talk by William H. Carr.

1938: Opening ceremonies for the First Avenue [Municipal] Market, with Mayor F.H. La Guardia.

1948: Teenagers compete on The Rising Star, a teen talent contest.

1956: The story of the completion of the Brooklyn Bridge in 1883 is dramatized on this edition of Historic City Hall.

1962: Robert Moses talks about management at Fordham University's 26th annual interclass dinner.

1975: Conversations From the Circle in the Square, with host Ted Mann. In this edition, he interviews actress Maureen Stapleton.

1984: Shreveport Leadbelly Memorial, with Brownie McGhee, Sonny Terry, Hally Wood, Peter Seeger and others on the Folksong Festival with Oscar Brand.

1996: Pianist Paulina Dokovska performs at The Frick Collection. Dokovska won First Prize at the Claude Debussy International Piano Competition, France and International Piano Competition of Senigallia, Italy. She has performed in Europe, the United States and eastern Asia. Dokovska has recorded for several major labels and has been on the piano faculty at the Mannes College of The New School for Music since 1995.

2001: Former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom Sir Edward Heath talks to Gilbert Kaplan on Mad About Music. As Prime Minister Heath had many firsts and is perhaps best known for leading Britain into the European Economic Community, but he was also the first Prime Minister since Arthur Balfour in 1906 to permanently install a piano and even a clavichord at 10 Downing Street.

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About NYPR Archives & Preservation

Mission Statement: The New York Public Radio Archives supports the mission and goals of WNYC and WQXR by honoring the broadcast heritage of the radio stations and preserving their organizational and programming legacy for future generations of public radio listeners. The Archives will collect, organize, document, showcase and make available for production all original work generated by and produced in association with WNYC and WQXR Radio.

The NYPR Archives serves the stations staff and producers by providing them with digital copies of our broadcast material spanning WNYC and WQXR's respective 89 and 77 year histories.  We also catalog, preserve and digitize, provide reference services, store, and acquire WNYC and WQXR broadcast material (originals and copies) missing from the collection. This repatriation effort has been aided by dozens of former WNYC and WQXR staff as well as a number of key institutions. Additionally, our collecting over the last ten years goes beyond sound and includes photos, publicity materials, program guides, microphones, coffee mugs, buttons and other ephemera. We've left no stone unturned in our pursuit of these artifacts. The History Notes is a showcase for many of these non-broadcast items in our collection. 

In fact, if you’ve got that vintage WNYC or WQXR knick-knack, gee-gaw, or maybe a photo of someone in front of our mic, an old program guide or vintage piece of remote equipment and would like to donate it to us, or provide a copy of the item to us, write to Andy Lanset at alanset@nypublicradio.org.   

The Archives and Preservation series was created to bring together the leading NYPR Archives related, created, or sourced content material at WNYC.org.

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