Streams

This Week: Must See Arts in the City

WNYC's Arts Datebook, October 28

Thursday, October 28, 2010 - 12:00 AM

WNYC

Edward Hopper at the Whitney, ghostly silhouettes in Chelsea, and dance at the Judson Memorial Church. Here's WNYC's guide to what's happening now.

Modern Life: Edward Hopper and His Time, at the Whitney Museum. Images where people seem to play supporting roles to the structures and environments that surround them—that’s what you’ll find in this mixed-media exhibit at the Whitney. It looks at art in the United States being produced in the first four decades of the 20th century, prior to the start of World War II. Naturally, it’s the painter Edward Hopper—he, of isolated people inhabiting isolated structures—who sets the tone. (The museum has extensive holdings of his work.) But included in the show will also be the work of his contemporaries, figures such as photographers Edward Steichen and Alfred Stieglitz, and painters Charles Burchfield and Ben Shahn. If you want to get a sense of what was happening in American art before the much-vaunted Abstract Expressionists so brashly took the stage (a subject we've been into lately), this is an excellent place to start. Opens today, in Manhattan.

Ana Mendieta: Documentation and Art Work, 1972-1985, at Galerie Lelong. This comprehensive retrospective, which marks the 25th anniversary of Ana Mendieta’s tragic death at the age of 36, will feature photography, drawings, sculpture and newly-restored films, some of which have never been seen before. This was an artist obsessed with the human body, its presence and its absence. Many of her images consist of her own silhouette imprinted on the earth or on structures. Others show her camouflaging her naked body into various natural environments. The pieces are ethereal, almost ghostly—appropriate to an artist whose presence can be felt still. Opens today, in Manhattan.

Maria Lassnig at Friedrich Petzel Gallery in Chelsea. The exhibit shows fleshy figures that are, at times, bulbous; at others, surreal. Lassnig is also an artist obsessed with the human form, but she places her figures in strange settings that are laced with a self-deprecating dash of absurdity. In this, her third solo show in New York, she will present a dozen recent canvases. Opens Friday at 6 P.M., in Manhattan.

A Sanctuary for the Arts: Judson Memorial Church and the Avant-Garde, 1954-1977, at the Fales Archive at NYU Library, in Greenwich Village. There are some spaces in New York where, if the walls could talk, there would be some pretty insane stories told. One of these is certainly the Judson Memorial Church, the free-spirited house of worship that has also served as a key artistic venue. One of its most famous events was a performance of Carolee Schneeman’s "Meat Joy," in 1964, a choreography that involved various scantily-clad dancers rolling about in paint, fish and meat. The new exhibit on Judson will explore this historic event, along with so many others. Everything kicks off this evening at 6:30 P.M. with a roundtable discussion that includes Schneeman, as well as violinist and composer Malcolm Goldstein and theatre performers Lee Guilliatt and Essie Borden. This will be followed by special performances at the Judson Church this Friday and Saturday. (Check the Web site for details.) Opens this evening, in Manhattan.

At Galerie LeLong, a retrospective to commemorate the 25th anniversary of Ana Mendieta's death. Above, a still from her 1974 Super 8 film 'Untitled (Blood Sign #1).'
The Estate of Ana Mendieta Collection Courtesy Galerie Lelong, New York
At Galerie LeLong, a retrospective to commemorate the 25th anniversary of Ana Mendieta's death. Above, a still from her 1974 Super 8 film 'Untitled (Blood Sign #1).'
Austrian artist Maria Lassnig will have some of her recent work on view at Friederich Petzel, such as the canvas 'Frog Princess,' from 2000.
Courtesy the artist and Friedrich Petzel
Austrian artist Maria Lassnig will have some of her recent work on view at Friederich Petzel, such as the canvas 'Frog Princess,' from 2000.
Lassnig frequently creates distorted figures whose uncanny stares can seem all too real. Above, 'Selbst mit Meerschweinchen,' from 2000/2001.
Courtesy the artist and Friedrich Petzel
Lassnig frequently creates distorted figures whose uncanny stares can seem all too real. Above, 'Selbst mit Meerschweinchen,' from 2000/2001.
Some of Lassnig's recent work shows figures against rich fields of color. Her 2009 painting, 'Optimisten/Optimists.'
Courtesy the artist and Friedrich Petzel
Some of Lassnig's recent work shows figures against rich fields of color. Her 2009 painting, 'Optimisten/Optimists.'
The Whitney Museum explores modern life in the first half of the 20th century. Paul Strand's 1915 image of Wall Street shows that the more things change, the more they stay the same.
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York
The Whitney Museum explores modern life in the first half of the 20th century. Paul Strand's 1915 image of Wall Street shows that the more things change, the more they stay the same.
Edward Hopper conveyed solitude and stillness in his works—all of it drenched with a sense of foreboding. Above, 'South Carolina Morning,' from 1955.
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York
Edward Hopper conveyed solitude and stillness in his works—all of it drenched with a sense of foreboding. Above, 'South Carolina Morning,' from 1955.

Tags:

More in:

News, weather, Radiolab, Brian Lehrer and more.
Get the best of WNYC in your inbox, every morning.

Leave a Comment

Register for your own account so you can vote on comments, save your favorites, and more. Learn more.
Please stay on topic, be civil, and be brief.
Email addresses are never displayed, but they are required to confirm your comments. Names are displayed with all comments. We reserve the right to edit any comments posted on this site. Please read the Comment Guidelines before posting. By leaving a comment, you agree to New York Public Radio's Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use.

Sponsored

About Gallerina

Carolina A. Miranda is a regular contributor to WNYC and blogs about the arts for the station as "Gallerina." In addition to that, she contributes articles on culture, travel and the arts to a variety of national and regional media, including Time, ArtNews, Travel + Leisure and Budget Travel and Florida Travel + Life. She has reported on the burgeoning industry of skatepark design, architectural pedagogy in Southern California, the presence of street art in museums and Lima's burgeoning food scene, among many other subjects. In 2008, she was named one of eight fellows in the USC Annenberg/Getty Arts Journalism Program for her arts and architecture blog C-Monster.net, which has received mentions in the Wall Street Journal and the New York Times. In January of 2010, the Times named her one of nine people to follow on Twitter. Got a tip? E-mail her at c [@] c-monster [dot] net

Feeds

Supported by