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WNYC's Datebook to Arts Events Around Town, Oct. 14

Thursday, October 14, 2010 - 12:00 AM

WNYC

Architectural films in Tribeca, explosive paintings in Chelsea, the totally insane video mash-ups of Jay Rosenblatt at MoMA, and the ladies of pop at the Brooklyn Museum. Here's WNYC's guide to what's happening now:

Joy Garnett, Boom & Bust, at Edward Winkleman Gallery, in Chelsea. This painter, long obsessed with roiling, vivid forms (like fire), turns her attention to a series of disembodied explosions. Or are they implosions? Or astral phenomena magnified a bajillion times? It can be hard to tell—not that any of this makes her brush work or color palette any less compelling. (In the event that you just have to know: much of Garnett’s work is inspired by military and scientific images she finds online.) While you’re at Winkleman, be sure to take a peek into the back room, where the gallery’s Curatorial Research Lab is showing the odd and humorous communiqués that renowned video-assemblage artist Nam June Paik sent to New York Times television critic John J. O’Connor over the course of the ‘70s and ‘80s. It’s a rich opportunity to snoop through someone else’s mail. Opens Friday at 6 PM, in Manhattan.

Seductive Subversion: Women Pop Artists 1958-1968, at the Brooklyn Museum. You’ve heard about the dudes, now it’s all about the tubes. This expansive exhibit will look at the contributions women have made in the field of pop art. Expect cheeky fun, totally biting works by an array of women artists, including Brooklyn-born Martha Rosler, collagist May Wilson and the perpetually out-there Yayoi Kusama. Opens Friday, in Brooklyn.

The Darkness of Day: Recent Films by Jay Rosenblatt, at the Museum of Modern Art. The Internet has made the video mash-up seem almost clichéd. But there are masters of the form—and Jay Rosenblatt is one of them. In "Phantom Limb," a riveting piece from 2005, he combines footage of a sheep being sheered with a mournful violin composition by Arvo Pärt with audio of a woman talking about grief. Call me crazy, but it totally works. (You can watch a snippet right here.) Through Oct. 18.

Architecture & Design Film Festival, in Tribeca. More than 40 films related to architecture and design will get big-screen time at Tribeca Cinema this week as part of the first ever Architecture & Design Film Festival. Keep an eye peeled for documentaries on the life of Milton Glaser (the graphic designer behind the "I ♥ New York" campaign), the revolutionary Brazilian modernist Oscar Niemeyer (the architect who designed the most iconic buildings in Brasilia), and the ‘70s architectural collective Ant Farm, the group known for planting all those Cadillacs in a Texas field. Kicks off today, in Manhattan.

These light colored candies are freaky, aren't they? Kay Kurt's painting 'For All Their Innocent Airs, They Know Exactly Where They're Going,' from 1968, at the Brooklyn Museum.
Collection of Neuberger Museum of Art, Purchase College
These light colored candies are freaky, aren't they? Kay Kurt's painting 'For All Their Innocent Airs, They Know Exactly Where They're Going,' from 1968, at the Brooklyn Museum.
'Untitled,' 1963, by Yayoi Kusama, a Japanese artist obsessed with tuber-esque forms, also at the Brooklyn Museum.
Private Collection, New York Courtesy of Peter Freeman, Inc., New York
'Untitled,' 1963, by Yayoi Kusama, a Japanese artist obsessed with tuber-esque forms, also at the Brooklyn Museum.
Martha Rosler is known for combining images of war with domestic settings. In a piece from 1967-72, she pairs First Lady  Pat Nixon with some horror art.
Courtesy of the Artist and Mitchell-Innes & Nash, New York
Martha Rosler is known for combining images of war with domestic settings. In a piece from 1967-72, she pairs First Lady Pat Nixon with some horror art.
May Wilson, who began her career in her 40s after raising a family, was known for collaging her face onto found images. Above, 'Ridiculous Portrait (Queen Elizabeth),' c. 1965-72.
Courtesy of William S. Wilson and Pavel Zoubok Gallery
May Wilson, who began her career in her 40s after raising a family, was known for collaging her face onto found images. Above, 'Ridiculous Portrait (Queen Elizabeth),' c. 1965-72.
At MoMA, Jay Rosenblatt's does for film what artists like Wilson and Rosler do for photographic imagery. Above, a still from 'The Darkness of Day,' from 2009.
Museum of Modern Art
At MoMA, Jay Rosenblatt's does for film what artists like Wilson and Rosler do for photographic imagery. Above, a still from 'The Darkness of Day,' from 2009.
'I Just Wanted to Be Somebody,' from 2006, another still from MoMA's Rosenblatt film series. (Interesting fact: clips from this film were featured in Gus Van Sant's movie 'Milk.')
Museum of Modern Art
'I Just Wanted to Be Somebody,' from 2006, another still from MoMA's Rosenblatt film series. (Interesting fact: clips from this film were featured in Gus Van Sant's movie 'Milk.')
At the Architecture & Design Film Festival, 'Visual Acoustics' examines the work of photographer Julius Shulman. Above, Shulman's famous shot of Richard Neutra's Kaufmann House in Palm Springs.
Courtesy Architecture & Design Film Festival
At the Architecture & Design Film Festival, 'Visual Acoustics' examines the work of photographer Julius Shulman. Above, Shulman's famous shot of Richard Neutra's Kaufmann House in Palm Springs.
Also at the film festival, 'Onion Pinch Baroque Counterpoise,' a film that looks at the way in which dancers interact with an architectural installation.
Courtesy Architecture & Design Film Festival
Also at the film festival, 'Onion Pinch Baroque Counterpoise,' a film that looks at the way in which dancers interact with an architectural installation.
From Joy Garnett's second solo show at the Winkleman Gallery: 'Sploosh,' a work from 2010.
Courtesy the artist and Edward Winkleman Gallery.
From Joy Garnett's second solo show at the Winkleman Gallery: 'Sploosh,' a work from 2010.
'Poof,' another piece by Garnett.
Courtesy the artist and Edward Winkleman Gallery.
'Poof,' another piece by Garnett.

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About Gallerina

Carolina A. Miranda is a regular contributor to WNYC and blogs about the arts for the station as "Gallerina." In addition to that, she contributes articles on culture, travel and the arts to a variety of national and regional media, including Time, ArtNews, Travel + Leisure and Budget Travel and Florida Travel + Life. She has reported on the burgeoning industry of skatepark design, architectural pedagogy in Southern California, the presence of street art in museums and Lima's burgeoning food scene, among many other subjects. In 2008, she was named one of eight fellows in the USC Annenberg/Getty Arts Journalism Program for her arts and architecture blog C-Monster.net, which has received mentions in the Wall Street Journal and the New York Times. In January of 2010, the Times named her one of nine people to follow on Twitter. Got a tip? E-mail her at c [@] c-monster [dot] net

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