Streams

Your Voting Stories

Are you a recent first-time voter? What has you energized?

Monday, October 04, 2010

Voting booths (flickr: Nate Shepard)

The deadline to register to vote in NY, NJ, and CT is coming up, and we here at It's A Free Country are thinking about what it takes to tip someone from a citizen to a voter. We want your stories: why are you a voter? What gets you to the polls? Is it continued Obama energy from 2008, or the rise of the Tea Party in 2010? Are you a new citizen, did you just turn 18? Let us know and post your ode to voting below!

David from Nyack, New York says he voted for the first time in 2008, but is disillusioned with the pace of change.

I actually do vote, I voted for the first time in the 2008 presidential election. I missed voting against Bush the second time by a month. I do vote, but it almost seems like it's for ceremony at this point. I vote to excercise my right as an American, but in anything in the presidential race it doesn't seem like it's very well observed.

Mario from Ocean Township, NJ says he will vote in 2010, even though he is frustrated with the pace of implementation of Obama's agenda.

The reason that I voted for the Democrats in 2008 it was because of the change they were promising us. And I think I will continue to vote, I will vote Democrat in November 4.

Beryl from Brooklyn just became a citizen. She'll be voting for the first time next month.

"Yes, I'm very excited to vote. I'm anxious," she says, laughing heartily. "Yes, I want to vote."

Kristin from suburban New Jersey says she votes, in part, for the right to complain.

Besides the obvious obligation to share my superior choices with my fellow citizens, I vote so that I can complain about what is going on in the various pockets of political insanity. Those who can but don't vote should not complain.

Tags:

More in:

Comments [5]

I will exercise my right to write-in a candidate because the candidates for NY governor are unqualified.

Most people don't even know what how and what the candidates really think. Politicians always say the stereotypical sound bytes -- low taxes, better education, less government, more jobs, blah blah blah.

No one ever says HOW they will achieve their goals. It's all lip service to get a job.

Oct. 04 2010 11:01 AM
Rose

Here's the thing...It's not just about voting, it's about understanding the system of government.

To stand against Obama without understanding the power of the House and Senate and how they are blocking a lot of his initiatives is embarrassing.

Oct. 04 2010 10:59 AM
Richard Johnston from Upper west side

It is disgraceful that any American has to "register" to claim the constitutional right to vote. In France every citizen can go to the polling place and is entitled to vote in any election. International observers will not supervise American elections for this among other reasons.

Oct. 04 2010 10:57 AM
Kristin from Suburban NJ

Besides the obvious obligation to share my superior choices with my fellow citizens, I vote so that I can complain about what is going on in the various pockets of political insanity. Those who can but don't vote should not complain.

Oct. 04 2010 10:38 AM
Juliet from Brooklyn

I vote and have always voted and always will vote because anyone who is not a white male should feel an obligation to those who fought and died for our right to vote. It is the most precious simple gift each of us has to participate in democracy

Oct. 04 2010 10:28 AM

Leave a Comment

Email addresses are required but never displayed.

Get the WNYC Morning Brief in your inbox.
We'll send you our top 5 stories every day, plus breaking news and weather.

Sponsored

About It's A Free Country ®

Archive of It's A Free Country articles and posts. Visit the It's A Free Country Home Page for lots more.

Supported by

WNYC is supported by the Charles H. Revson Foundation: Because a great city needs an informed and engaged public.  Learn more at revsonfoundation.org.

Feeds

Supported by