Streams

Debating Paid Sick Leave

Wednesday, September 29, 2010

The city council is considering legislation requiring companies to offer their employees paid sick leave. Kathryn Wylde, president and CEO of the Partnership for New York City, and Dan MorrisDrum Major Institute communications director, debate the issue.

Guests:

Dan Morris and Kathryn Wylde

Comments [24]

larry from UWS

these two guests were AWFUL. they should be retrained. They are both so obnoxious that they undermine their POVs. they should have just made their points and disucssed the iddue, but instead spent nearly all their time discrediting each other.

guess what. there is NO single truth no matter what the methodology. They should both read Freakonomics and Outliers, and work together.

next time they should focus on the main iddue and make three ponts and not just argue methods

Sep. 30 2010 12:51 AM
Helga from E. Harlem

ex-sf from nyc is incorrect. the $1 or other charges added to restaurant was because health insurance was extended to almost all employees in sf - while I'd love that in nyc - that is not the situation here - we are talking about a VERY limited amount of paid sick days...not full health insurance.

Sep. 29 2010 11:43 AM
ex-sf from NYC

I used to live in San Francisco and after this became law, the cost was then passed on to the consumers. Restaurants started adding a $1 fee per entree, listed at the bottom of the menu as "health care costs for our employees."

Sep. 29 2010 10:52 AM

if people prayed more they would never get sick

Sep. 29 2010 10:51 AM
minnyc from NYC

Kathyn is a terrible debater. All she does is deny instead of re-spinning what Dan says.

Sep. 29 2010 10:49 AM
Leah from Brooklyn

Employers constantly wail that they'll need to lay folks off. It's like Atlas constantly threatening to shrug. I'm sure they'll find a way to make money regardless. Sick leave seems like a humane right - aside from the fact that I don't want a waiter serving me who is sick.

Sep. 29 2010 10:49 AM
NJ Citizen

This is one more instance of our perennial social tug of war between small business owners and the workers they need to hire after the business outgrows the time and energy available in the family (even extended family). "Mom and Pop" find that hired workers are just not as gung ho or loyal or what have you as the blood relatives. Duh--hired help is not family! But hired workers want to enjoy the same kind of social and economic safety net 'by law' that family members informally expect and enjoy because of ties of blood and love. We will see this problem coming up perennially as long as Mom and Pop businesses try to grow (without going bankrupt) and workers find that small business is where the majority of new jobs are showing up.

Sep. 29 2010 10:49 AM
J from nj

this is the emptiest, biggest waste of time I've ever heard on your show. What bloody nonsense.

Sep. 29 2010 10:48 AM
The Truth from Becky

Everyone should get at least 1 week paid sick time to be used as needed. We don't have free health care in the country so it should just be another expense the business owner has to shoulder! Business expense same as unemployment insurance.

Sep. 29 2010 10:48 AM
katie from Brooklyn

These two need a timeout!!! It's painful to listen to them.

Sep. 29 2010 10:48 AM
quiet please

TELL THAT WOMAN TO STOP INTERRUPTING AND SHOUTING DOWN THE OTHER GUEST! IT IS VERY ANNOYING.

Sep. 29 2010 10:46 AM
Phil Henshaw from way uptown

The pointless debates between academics defending their half baked methods is really dreary. I think the valid point raised didn't get given appropriate attention. There seem to be large sectors of small business that both would and would not be harmed, and corresponding employees that would and would not be helped. The real question is how to distinguish between them, right??

Sep. 29 2010 10:46 AM

Why are letting Dan run his mouth?

Sep. 29 2010 10:45 AM
Helen from Woodside

Imagine that the business associations don't want to pay for sick time! Um, she didn't really have to do a "study" to come up with this. It is right that people who get the flu don't have to worry about going w/out food or risk eviction for taking one or two days off from work. Somethings are just write and no amount of corporate double speak changes that.

Sep. 29 2010 10:45 AM
Molly

I think this is a wonderful idea. Having worked at a small retail store (which does not offer paid sick leave) for many years it's very hard to keep yourself healthy if no one can afford to take a day off. Illnesses make the rounds and get everyone, including the customers, sick.

Sep. 29 2010 10:44 AM
Mary from Manhattan

I work for a large nationwide retailer with 2 locations in NYC. I get paid when I work. If I am sick I do not get paid. It's not just small retailers that don't offer sick leave.

Sep. 29 2010 10:44 AM

I completely disagree that employees are primarily getting higher hourly wages don't get sick leave. She is leaving out a huge chunk of women who work in such areas as childbirth education or child care or parental education. Almost all of the childbirth educators I know do NOT get sick leave from their place of employment. They are not working for nonprofits. I do not agree that informal arrangements work in this situation and it furthermore leads to unsafe conditions whereby sick workers end up exposing others to their influenza virus' in the winter because they cannot afford to not go to work. I do NOT believe that she did any sort of a scientific survey and as a small business owner myself, I am really getting sick and tired of them leaving people like myself out of the picture. She certainly did not interview anyone I know in my field.

Sep. 29 2010 10:44 AM
detour from park slope

Temp workers, perma-temps, "consultants" don't get paid sick leave. And considering that the temping of the work force is a common practice among many large companies to maximize profits, it's both unconscionable and bad practice. I used to go to the offiice (until I was laid off in this great recession) sick regularly, just to get paid. God knows how many people I made sick, or what the actual cost to the company really was.

Sep. 29 2010 10:44 AM

Why are you letting Don run this interview? He is needless aggressive. If Kathy were a man, would he be acting so badly? Damn.

Sep. 29 2010 10:43 AM
sam from NJ

Tired of hearing these two argue with each other.

Sep. 29 2010 10:43 AM

I completely disagree that employees are primarily getting higher hourly wages don't get sick leave. She is leaving out a huge chunk of women who work in such areas as childbirth education or child care or parental education. Almost all of the childbirth educators I know do NOT get sick leave from their place of employment. They are not working for nonprofits. I do not agree that informal arrangements work in this situation and it furthermore leads to unsafe conditions whereby sick workers end up exposing others to their influenza virus' in the winter because they cannot afford to not go to work. I do NOT believe that she did any sort of a scientific survey and as a small business owner myself, I am really getting sick and tired of them leaving people like myself out of the picture. She certainly did not interview anyone I know in my field.

Sep. 29 2010 10:42 AM
office from office

Another do gooder that will drive small business into the ground. Has she ever ran a business??

How do you stop abuse??

Sep. 29 2010 10:39 AM
b from manhattan

it's a very nice idea, but 5-9 seems unbelievably excessive. i've never heard of anything even close to that. 3 or 3-5, i could see, but 5-9? makes me wonder if they really want it to happen...

Sep. 29 2010 10:39 AM

this is too far even for me.
if you want a good job get a degree or join a union. the government should not tell business what to do to ltheir abor other than safety and minimum wage.

Sep. 29 2010 10:35 AM

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