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City Rings in First Day of Fall With Sukkahs, Mooncakes and Carnivals

Wednesday, September 22, 2010

New Yorkers can hardly rely on temperature or the changing colors of leaves to signify the first day of fall. But a stroll through Williamsburg, Brooklyn with wooden sukkahs consuming the sidewalks in front of synagogues and jutting out on balconies are one sign of the season. Pancake-shaped mooncakes for sale in Chinatown and sizzling treats from the Feast of San Gennaro in Little Italy are reminders that summer has officially ended. Check out images of fall celebrations across the city.

Freun Shea, 10, selling palms in Williamsburg, Brooklyn for the week-long festival of Sukkot.
Stephen Nessen/WNYC

Freun Shea, 10, selling palms in Williamsburg, Brooklyn for the week-long festival of Sukkot.

Members of the Tannenbaum family selling the citrus fruit etrog, for Sukkot, in Williamsburg, Brooklyn.
Stephen Nessen/WNYC

Members of the Tannenbaum family selling the citrus fruit etrog, for Sukkot, in Williamsburg, Brooklyn.

Shulem Tannenbaum standing in his family's backyard-sukkah in Williamsburg, Brooklyn.
Stephen Nessen/WNYC

Shulem Tannenbaum standing in his family's backyard-sukkah in Williamsburg, Brooklyn.

Balcony sukkahs in Williamsburg, Brooklyn.
Stephen Nessen/WNYC

Balcony sukkahs in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. 

Large sukkah outside of a synagogue in Williamsburg, Brooklyn.
Stephen Nessen/WNYC

Large sukkah outside of a synagogue in Williamsburg, Brooklyn.

Kids selling etrog in Williamsburg, Brooklyn
Stephen Nessen/WNYC

Kids selling etrog in Williamsburg, Brooklyn

The local Chinese newspaper Sing Tao has the full moon on the cover for the start of mid-autumn festival, which always falls on the 15th day of the eighth month on the Chinese calendar. It's also know
Stephen Nessen/WNYC

The local Chinese newspaper Sing Tao has the full moon on the cover for the start of mid-autumn festival, which always falls on the 15th day of the eighth month on the Chinese calendar. It's also known as mooncake festival, for the sugary, pancake (or full-moon) shaped treats that are eaten on this holiday.

Mooncakes for sale in Chinatown, under the Williamsburg bridge for mid-autumn festival.
Stephen Nessen/WNYC

Mooncakes for sale in Chinatown, under the Williamsburg Bridge for the autumn festival.

Mooncakes for sale outside of a Chinese bakery on East Broadway.
Stephen Nessen/WNYC

Mooncakes for sale outside of a Chinese bakery on East Broadway.

Mulberry Street in Little Italy is turned into a carnival-like atmosphere for the Feast of San Gennaro, the patron Saint of Naples
Stephen Nessen/WNYC

Mulberry Street in Little Italy is turned into a carnival-like atmosphere for the Feast of San Gennaro, the patron Saint of Naples.

Visitors leave money for charity at the statue of San Gennara at the Most Precious Blood Church on Mulberry Street in Little Italy.
Stephen Nessen

Visitors leave money for charity at the statue of San Gennaro at the Most Precious Blood Church on Mulberry Street in Little Italy.

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Comments [2]

Ioannis Dounias from Salt Lake City, Utah

New York is a cultural center if not the cultural capital of the world. It is a model for any city in the world aspiring to create a cosmopolitan status or improve it.

Sep. 23 2010 11:44 PM
David from Vienna, Austria

This is why New York is the greatest city in the world!!!

Sep. 23 2010 05:52 AM

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