Streams

Pop + Politics: Farai Chideya Talks to Florida Gov. Charlie Crist

Thursday, September 09, 2010

Florida Governor Charlie Crist speaks during the 826/836 Interchange Project Dedication Ceremony on April 26, 2010 in Miami, Florida. (Joe Raedle/Getty)

WNYC partner Pop + Politics is on the road this week in Florida, where an interesting gubernatorial contest is shaping up. Florida's current governor, Charlie Crist, is running for reelection, but not as a Republican. Pop + Politics' Farai Chideya spoke with Crist on Tuesday.

Crist is engaged in a very unusual three-way race. The former Republican, facing a tough primary challenge from the more conservative Marco Rubio, renounced his party and became an Independent. Now he's facing Rubio, a Cuban-American running on the Republican ticket and a black American, Kendrick Meek, running as a Democrat.

Despite the racial diversity of the field, race is not by any means the biggest issue here -- a fragmented, refracted party politics is. What happens when the Tea Party movement rejects some Republican candidates for not being conservative enough?

Tags:

More in:

News, weather, Radiolab, Brian Lehrer and more.
Get the best of WNYC in your inbox, every morning.

Leave a Comment

Register for your own account so you can vote on comments, save your favorites, and more. Learn more.
Please stay on topic, be civil, and be brief.
Email addresses are never displayed, but they are required to confirm your comments. Names are displayed with all comments. We reserve the right to edit any comments posted on this site. Please read the Comment Guidelines before posting. By leaving a comment, you agree to New York Public Radio's Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use.

Sponsored

About It's A Free Country ®

Archive of It's A Free Country articles and posts. Visit the It's A Free Country Home Page for lots more.

Supported by

WNYC is supported by the Charles H. Revson Foundation: Because a great city needs an informed and engaged public.  Learn more at revsonfoundation.org.

Feeds

Supported by