Streams

Coast Guard Warns of Red Tide

Monday, September 06, 2010

The Coast Guard says a nearly 10-mile-long ribbon of red tide has been spotted in New York Harbor.

The naturally occurring reddish brown algae bloom stretches from the area near the Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum off Midtown Manhattan's West Side to Hoffman Island, off Staten Island. Another patch was spotted about three miles south of Long Island's Jones Beach Inlet.

The Coast Guard say swimmers and boaters should avoid contact with the reddish-brown sheen; it can cause skin and eye irritation, and breathing problems. Red tide can occur in coastal areas when the seas are warm.

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Comments [3]

marine phytoplankton

Now i know all about the growth of marine phytoplankton. Its availability and where it limits to. This a a great help for me. Thanks for sharing it!

Sep. 20 2010 10:38 AM
marine phytoplankton

Now i know all about the growth of marine phytoplankton. Its availability and where it limits to. This a a great help for me. Thanks for sharing it!

Sep. 20 2010 10:36 AM
Concerned Citizen from New Jersey

I was curious about the short report on the red algae bloom and how innocent the situation was reported to be. I quote your article above "naturally occurring"...

I did some digging and discovered that "red tides are caused by increase in nutrients that algae need, usually due to farm runoff, causing an overpopulation. Their occurrence in some locations appear to be entirely natural, while in others they appear to be a result of human activities. The frequency and severity of algae blooms in some parts of the world have been linked to increased nutrient loading from human activities. In other areas, algal blooms are a seasonal occurrence resulting from coastal upwelling, a natural result of the movement of certain ocean currents. The growth of marine phytoplankton is generally limited by the availability of nitrates and phosphates, which can be abundant in agricultural run-off as well as coastal upwelling zones. Coastal water pollution produced by humans and systematic increase in sea water temperature have also been implicated as contributing factors in red tides"

This discovery highlights the human factor environmental impact that is more likely the cause around such a populous regions such as NYC and the state of NJ. I wonder if there was some serious factory runoff or some other minor disaster that is being covered up??

Sep. 07 2010 09:06 AM

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