Streams

14 Cases of West Nile Found in City Over Summer

Friday, September 03, 2010

Fourteen human cases of the mosquito-borne West Nile virus have been reported in the city this summer. That's the highest number since officials in New York first registered the disease in 2000.

Dr. Sally Slavinski, Director of the Vector-Borne Disease Unit in the city's Department of Health says that while the summer may be coming to an end, there is still danger of infection in all five boroughs.

"With another four to six weeks of warm weather, mosquitoes are going to remain active until mid to late October, so we don't want people to let their guard down at this point," Slavinski says. "We do consider all New Yorkers to be at risk for infection. And while persons of any age can get sick from infection, its those folks that are 50 and over that are at greater risk for developing a more severe illness if they are infected."

The Department of Health recommends using insect repellent, closing window screens, and draining pools of standing water to eliminate mosquito habitat.
[Signs of West Nile virus range from flu-like symptoms to headaches and extreme fatigue.]

The Department of Health recommends using insect repellent, closing window screens and draining pools of standing water to eliminate mosquito habitat.

Signs of West Nile Virus can range from mild flu-like symptoms to muscle aches and extreme fatigue. In extreme cases, the disease can lead to fatal infections of the brain and spinal cord like menigitis and encephalitis.

Tags:

More in:

News, weather, Radiolab, Brian Lehrer and more.
Get the best of WNYC in your inbox, every morning.

Comments [1]

Emily Motherwell from Manhattan

WNYC, you are awesome -- but really? This is news?
In a city of 8,363,710 people, the fact that there's only 14 incidents of anything is only remarkable for it's incredible unlikelihood.
Perhaps that's what you were pointing out, the fact that I've got .00016738983058953503% chance of contracting West Nile.
That actually makes me feel a lot better. Thank you!

Sep. 03 2010 09:34 PM

Leave a Comment

Register for your own account so you can vote on comments, save your favorites, and more. Learn more.
Please stay on topic, be civil, and be brief.
Email addresses are never displayed, but they are required to confirm your comments. Names are displayed with all comments. We reserve the right to edit any comments posted on this site. Please read the Comment Guidelines before posting. By leaving a comment, you agree to New York Public Radio's Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use.

Sponsored

Latest Newscast

 

 

Support

WNYC is supported by the Charles H. Revson Foundation: Because a great city needs an informed and engaged public

Feeds

Supported by