Streams

Good Sports

« previous episode | next episode »

Monday, September 06, 2010

Today we're airing some of our favorite interviews from the summer. Historian William Jelani Cobb looks at how Barack Obama won the Democratic nomination without the support of much of the established black leadership. He argues that the term "postracial" is inaccurate. Then, one man discusses the struggles he and his estranged cousin went through in order to get a kidney transplant. Also, Vendela Vida talks about her new novel, The Lovers. Plus, New Yorker editor David Remnick and longtime writer Roger Angell discuss the art of sports writing.

Barack Obama and the Paradox of Progress

Historian William Jelani Cobb looks at the 2008 election of Barack Obama—who won the Democratic nomination even though old-line civil rights leaders—Jesse Jackson, John Lewis, Andrew Young—all openly supported Hillary Clinton. In The Substance of Hope: Barack Obama and the Paradox of Progress, Cobb examines America's changing political and social landscape, and a new generation of voters with priorities not shaped by the legacy of Jim Crow.

Comments [2]

Searching for a New Kidney

Daniel Asa Rose discusses the lengths he and his cousin Larry Feldman went to in order to get a kidney transplant. In Larry’s Kidney, Rose tells the story of helping his black-sheep cousin, who he hadn’t spoken to in 15 years, go to China and secure a kidney transplant, even though Chinese law forbids transplants to Westerners.

Comment

Vendela Vida’s The Lovers

Vendela Vida talks about her new novel,  The Lovers, about the love between husbands and wives, mothers and children. It tells the story of Now Yvonne, a widow with grown twin children, who returns to the Turkish coastal village where she and he husband honeymooned, hoping to remember a happier time. But her plans for a restorative vacation are quickly complicated.

Comment

Sportswriting from The New Yorker

New Yorker editor David Remnick and longtime writer Roger Angell discuss the art of sports writing. The Only Game in Town, Sportswriting from the New Yorker is a classic collection of more than eighty years of some of the wisest, funniest, and most moving sports writing around—from reportage and analysis to profiles and tributes.

Comments [1]

Get the WNYC Morning Brief in your inbox.
We'll send you our top 5 stories every day, plus breaking news and weather.