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Prison Without Walls

Monday, August 23, 2010

Atlantic magazine contributing editor Graeme Wood explores the radical idea of turning prisons inside out, with convicts released into society under constant electronic surveillance. His article “Prison Without Walls” is in the September issue of The Atlantic.

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Graeme Wood

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Comments [7]

Herman from Long Beach

Criminals serving their sentences outside prison. I'm not for it.

I know that housing criminals is expensive, but did you know that Californians voted several times for the '3 Strike Rule'? We got tired of criminals committing crimes, getting convicted, serving a short sentence, getting out of prison, committing another crime going back to prison, getting out, committing another crime, etc.
I am personally ok with paying the taxes to keep criminals in prison for their entire sentence.

We have some people here in California that are simply too stupid to figure out that crime should not pay.

KP

Aug. 24 2010 03:27 PM
Kurt

These devices will not deter criminals who have mental illnesses, are sociopaths or get high enough to dismiss any notion of right-doing or wrong-doing.

Would you feel better knowing the rapist living next door to your daughter has a device on his ankle "but really feels stigmatized" by it?

This device seems better suited to punishing criminals AFTER they commit a crime rather than serving to prevent one.

Aug. 23 2010 12:44 PM
Taher from Croton on Hudson

Instead of spending on kinds of electronic gadgets, how about drug rehab programs? What an idea? Gee Whiz? Da.
No, human beings are not dogs.

Aug. 23 2010 12:44 PM
Taher from Croton on Hudson

Instead of spending on kinds of electronic gadgets, how about drug rehab programs? What an idea? Gee Whiz? Da.
No, human beings are not dogs.

Aug. 23 2010 12:41 PM
Marissa from Manhattan

Loopt: Penal edition.
Iphone App Store's next big seller.

Aug. 23 2010 12:32 PM
amalgam from Manhattan by day, NJ by night

This calls to mind a high-tech formulation of Michel Foucault's analysis of punishment using Jeremy Bentham's concept of "Panopticon" prisons.

_Snapshot of From Wikipedia_: "In the Panopticon, a single guard can watch over many prisoners while the guard remains unseen. Ancient prisons have been replaced by clear and visible ones, but Foucault cautions that "visibility is a trap." It is through this visibility, Foucault writes, that modern society exercises its controlling systems of power and knowledge (terms Foucault believed to be so fundamentally connected that he often combined them in a single hyphenated concept, "power-knowledge")."

Foucault: _Discipline and Punishment_

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michel_Foucault

Aug. 23 2010 12:17 PM
jgarbuz

It is all well and good to be able to have non-violent prisoners live at home. But then the question remains, how are they to get income for food and housing? Will they be allowed to work? Will the gov't pay for their food and housing? And how many people will be needed to man those security monitors to check up on them all? Will this save the $50,000 a year to keep them in prison, or actually cost more to let them live outside in a manner safe to the community?

Aug. 23 2010 12:09 PM

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