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Ask the Historian: Post Your Manhattan Questions

Monday, August 16, 2010

You've heard that the Dutch bought Manhattan island from the native Algonquin Indians, but was the price really equivalent to $24? And where did the name Manhattan come from?

All this week, WNYC is collecting your questions about Manhattan and posing them to borough historian Michael Miscione.

Check back here to see his answers and learn more about the iconic heart, and economic engine, of New York City.

More in:

Comments [34]

Jeanie from NYC

According to Google you have a comment that I would like to read but cannot find here. It starts:

Ask the Historian: Post Your Manhattan Questions - WNYC
Aug 16, 2010 ... Part of West 138 St. was renamed to honor Odell M. Clark, a Harlem political strategist who served as chief of staff for the embattled U.S. ...
www.wnyc.org/articles/.../ask-historian-post-your-manhattan-questions/

Is there any way to get the full write-up?

Thanks.

Dec. 24 2010 04:59 PM

Thank you for all your questions to all the borough historians. We are no longer accepting questions for this feature.

You can still read over previous questions and answers for all the borough historians. Manhattan is below.

Queens
http://beta.wnyc.org/articles/wnyc-news/2010/jul/19/ask-historian-post-your-queens-questions/

Brooklyn
http://beta.wnyc.org/articles/wnyc-news/2010/jul/25/ask-historian-ask-your-brooklyn-questions/

The Bronx
http://beta.wnyc.org/articles/wnyc-news/2010/aug/02/ask-historian-post-your-questions-about-bronx/

Staten Island
http://beta.wnyc.org/articles/wnyc-news/2010/aug/09/ask-historian-post-your-staten-island-questions/

Aug. 23 2010 08:49 PM

From Michael Miscione:

Reply to Brian Lemaire:

You asked about guided tours that include the of the Standard Oil Building (26 Broadway) near Bowling Green. I asked a couple of tour guide friends about this. They both used to give tours that would stop there, but no longer do. Anyway, one of them suggested you ask at the Museum of American Finance; they used to offer tours that included the lobby, he said, but he is not sure if they still do. Their website: www.moaf.org.

BTW, in general, building lobbies are getting harder to tour, Francis Morrone, my architectural historian colleague, told me. Sometimes the security staff will allow it, sometimes not.

He added this:

"The [Standard Oil Building] lobby is beautiful, but not necessarily in the WOW kind of way the public expects. It is restrained and elegant. The real WOW space is across the street, 25 Broadway, the Cunard Building, which has been closed to the public (even though it's a designated landmark interior) since the post office vacated the space. The old Cunard ticketing office is almost as large as the concourse of Grand Central Terminal, and has the best frescoes in the city -- and is completely invisible now."

-------------------------

Reply to Neal from Westchester, NY:

You asked if there is a secret tunnel that led from J.P. Morgan's home to the home of his mistress.

I doubt it. The mistress in question was Mrs. Adelaide Douglas, who lived at 57 Park, as you stated. She was a mature, established and refined woman estranged from her husband, not some chippy-of-the-week, by the way. According to the biographical accounts I've read, Morgan simply walked to her place, block or two away, and entered through a back door. No mention of any tunnel.

Another factor that casts doubt on the tunnel theory is this. Park Avenue separated the lovers' homes. There were streetcar tracks running in a covered trench under Park Avenue at the time. Automobiles use this tunnel today to zip from 33rd Street to the ramp that rings Grand Central Terminal. Morgan's tunnel would have had to intersect with the streetcar trench, or his tunnel would have had to be deeper than the tracks. Both scenarios sound unlikely to me.

Aug. 23 2010 08:42 PM
Dennis from Westchester

Recently I was contemplating the New York state emblem which is on the state flag and learned the goddess of Liberty is holding a liberty pole, with a liberty cap on top. In researching liberty poles I discovered several had been erected in the city during the revolutionary war period.

Could you share any additional information you may have about liberty poles or caps?

Aug. 21 2010 08:20 AM
WNYC Newsroom

From Michael Miscione:

Reply to Dave from Brooklyn:
(About 20 years ago, when I was living in Washington Heights, a friend and I were walking by a small park near Riverside Drive, where all the ramps to the George Washington Bridge begin, and we were alarmed to see what appeared to be a body wrapped in a rug in the small stand of woods that made up the park. We flagged down a policeman who investigated. He took a knife, slit open the carpet and started back violently, saying he saw hair. He looked closer and saw that it was a dog, not a human. Some time later I was walking by the park again and saw the Parks Department had put a sign up with the name of the park on it. The name was "Dead Dog Park!" I'd love to know how that park got it's name. Was I myself in at the kill, or is this a spot known as a place to lay beloved pets to rest?)

As soon as I heard that there was a Dead Dog Park I said to myself that this has the fingerprints of former NYC Parks Commissioner Henry Stern all over it. Henry was (and is) quite a colorful guy. He’s also a friend of mine, so I gave him a call. Here is what he told me.

The scene opens in the 1980s during the Mayor Koch years. It was Rosh Hashanah and Henry was with his wife walking near Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center. In a patch of dirt and brush he noticed a dead dog, colored gray, that had been strung up with its front and rear paws tied. Henry surmised the carcass had been used in a Santería ritual.

Assuming the grisly scene was on city parkland, Henry called up his Manhattan Parks Commissioner and told him to have the dog removed. Later on Henry checked with his commissioner who told him the dog had, in fact, been disposed of.

Days later, Henry returned to the spot only to find that the dog was still there. He ordered his commissioner to join him at the site. When the fellow got there he was shocked to see that his underlings had obviously misinformed him. Henry wanted to teach his commissioner a lesson, so he decreed that, “Henceforth, this plot of land will be called Dead Dog Park!” Every time his commissioner passed the spot, Henry reasoned, he would be reminded of Henry’s Rule #17, “Don’t expect – inspect!”

When Betsy Gotbaum replaced Henry, under Mayor Dinkins, she thought the park name was undignified and eliminated it. It turned out that the whole matter was moot because the site was not city parkland after all, and it was eventually built over. According to Henry, a state mental hospital now sits on the location.

So, Dave, it sounds like “your” dog was not the catalyst for naming Dead Dog Park after all. Henry saw one, and you saw another one. I imagine that many unfortunate pooches ended up in that spot during that period.

But thanks for your question. It led to the telling of a great story.

Aug. 20 2010 05:01 PM
Meredith from Brooklyn

What, when, and where is the very first statue and park in Manhattan? Thanks!

Aug. 20 2010 07:59 AM
Rebekah from Uptown

Is it true that there were no permanent settlements in southern Manhattan prior to the arrival of the white man? I heard once that the natives would visit there as a source of energy and renewal, but that it was too intense a source to stay too long as it would lead to craziness. This anecdote was offered to me once as a reasoning for why things have always been a little crazy down there, from the early days of shipping to the intensity of Wall Street trading.

Aug. 19 2010 09:45 PM
Neal from Westchester, NY

Years ago I was working in #57 Park ave, which was at that time the US Olympic Headquarters. A fellow there told me that house was, at one time, JP Morgan's townhouse. During the summer, he would send his wife and children out to Morgan's Island, near Glen Cove. He also said that there is a tunnel between the basement of that house and the Morgan Library on Madison Ave., and that old JP's mistress used to enter the library. She then walked through the underground tunnel to spend the night with good old JP. Since no one would suspect a woman entering the library, the press, who constantly kept tabs on Mr. Morgan, was never the wiser as to what was going on. Have you ever heard this story, and can you possibly verify its veracity?

Aug. 19 2010 09:18 PM
WNYC Newsroom

From Michael Miscione:

Reply to progressive from Staten Island: (The Farley Post Office, Macy's and Penn Station are built in the former African American Tenderloin neighborhood. Earlier, free Blacks were forced out of Five Points, and Lower Manhattan. Where did displaced African Americans relocate?)

The short answer: Harlem.

Racial tensions grew in the Tenderloin in the late 19th century as newly
arrived immigrants from eastern and southern Europe competed with
African Americans for low-skilled jobs and cheap housing. The situation
in the neighborhood reached a boiling point in August of 1900 when a
race riot erupted over the killing of a white policeman (see more
below).

Within the next few years, blacks were moving north. Some settled into a
neighborhood known as San Juan Hill, roughly the area of today's Lincoln
Center. Others went to Harlem. A housing market collapse there resulted
in low rents. Realty companies, targeting blacks, drew African Americans
uptown in large numbers. By 1914 Harlem had 50,000 black inhabitants.

Three newspaper accounts of the 1900 riot:

New York Times, August 16, 1900
http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?_r=1&res=9C03E0DC1039E733A
25755C1A96E9C946197D6CF

New-York Tribune, August 16, 1900 *
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83030214/1900-08-16/ed-1/seq-1/

The Evening World, August 16, 1900 (evening edition) *
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83030193/1900-08-16/ed-1/seq-1/

Aug. 19 2010 08:01 PM
WNYC Newsroom

From Michael Miscione:

Reply to Geoff Hare from Manhattan: (Is there a central record of deaths and places of burial (and indeed births) in New York and from when does it date? and how can the public get access? I have found the newspaper reports (NYTimes 1899) and parish records not always accurate in trying to trace families.)

To my knowledge there are no centralized records for burial sites. The
good news is that some cemeteries have created (or are creating)
searchable databases of their, umm, residents. The bad news is that
there is a long way to go.

New York birth and death records, on the other hand, are relatively
centralized. According to the NYC Municipal Archives website:

Apply to the Municipal Archives for records of births reported before
1910, and deaths reported before 1949, in the five Boroughs of New York
City. (For more info and forms visit:
http://www.nyc.gov/html/records/html/vitalrecords/home.shtml . Note: You
can also visit the Muni Archives and conduct a vital records search in
person. For more info about that option, see:
http://www.nyc.gov/html/records/html/vitalrecords/visit.shtml .)

For birth records after 1909 and death records after 1948, for all five
boroughs of New York City. Apply to: New York City Department of
Health's Vital Records Division. (For more info visit:
http://www.nyc.gov/html/doh/html/home/home.shtml .)

For records outside the five Boroughs of New York City. Apply to: New
York State Department of Health, Vital Records Section, Empire State
Plaza, Tower Building, Albany, New York, N.Y. 12337. Fee: $15.00.
Information: (518) 474-3075. (For more info visit:
http://www.nyhealth.gov/vital_records/ .)

Good luck!

Aug. 19 2010 07:59 PM
WNYC Newsroom

From Michael Miscione:

Reply to Mike from Inwood: (At 216st and Broadway there is a two story high Roman style arch that appears to be 100+ years old...My question is why was such an archetypally public structure built for private use? Or if it was built by the city, how and when was it transferred to private ownership? )

The structure you are referring to is known as the Seaman Estate Arch or
the Seaman-Drake Arch. It is not a city-built structure, but the
entrance gate of bygone private estate. For a full explanation, I will
borrow from an excellent article written about the arch in 2003 by James
Renner, a member of my team of community historians, representing
Community District #12. James is an expert in the history of Inwood,
Washington Heights, and Marble Hill, and often leads tours of those
neighborhoods. Here's what he had to say:

"In 1851 John and Valentine Seaman bought 25 acres of land between 214th
and 218th Streets, and the Kingsbridge Road (now Broadway) north and
west to the Spuyten Duyvil Creek. Valentine built a house on top of a
hill between what is now Park Terrace East and Park Terrace West. The
house was used as a country residence for seasonal use. In 1855, the
arch was constructed as a gateway to the hilltop estate. Its
measurements were 35 feet high, 20 feet deep and 40 feet wide. Iron
Pivots for a large gate still exist in the passageway. On the rear of
the arch are windows suggesting that there may have been quarters for a
gatekeeper.

James F. Seaman eventually became the principal occupant of the estate
and married Ann Drake. In her will dated 1883, Mrs. Seaman bequeathed
her part of the estate to her nephew Lawrence Drake.

In 1905 the estate was sold to a contractor named Thomas Dwyer. Over the
next few years the appearance of the property started to change. In 1912
the first of a series of low brick buildings began to surround the
archway, forming a kind of compound built by Dwyer. These became auto
dealerships. In 1938 Dwyer sold the main house to developers. The only
thing that remained of the old estate was the arch."

James Renner's entire article can be found here:
http://www.washington-heights.us/history/archives/seamandrake_arch_87.ht
ml

Aug. 19 2010 07:58 PM
WNYC Newsroom

From Michael Miscione:

Reply to liz: (Is it true that Broadway used to be an Indian trail?)

Was Broadway an Indian trail, you ask. Yes and no. But mostly no. I love
this question because it offers me a chance to clarify an oft-repeated
half-truth.

Today's Broadway follows an Indian trail only at the very northern and
southern ends of Manhattan Island, and for a short coincidental run from
about Union Square to Madison Square. Just about everything else is the
product of the white man's city planning efforts.

Let me explain. The main north-south Manhattan Indian trail was called
the Wecquaesgeeks Trail (using just one of various spellings I've seen);
it went from the very southernmost tip of the island to the very
northernmost tip. When the Dutch settled in the Battery, they
incorporated a piece of this trail into their street grid. This became
Broadway -- up to a point. A little bit south of today's City Hall --
right around J&R Music World -- the Indian trail veers east, following a
route that meanders up the middle of the island, but favoring the east
side a bit.

Broadway, meanwhile, continues straight uptown until around 10th Street,
where it begins to tilt toward the west side. It follows this rough
diagonal until around 79th Street. Then is shoots unwaveringly uptown to
W. 169th Street (with just one quick shift to the west at 103rd Street).
This long stretch of Broadway, from around City Hall to Washington
Heights, follows the paths of two roads built after white settlement:
the Bloomingdale Road and the Boulevard.

At W. 169th Street Broadway rejoins the old Wecquaesgeeks Trail and
wiggles its way to the northern tip of Manhattan Island.

If you want to walk the Indian trials, here's what I suggest. Start at
the Battery. Walk north along Broadway. Bear right at Park Row. Make
your way to the Bowery (which might take some doing, with Police Plaza
in the way). Take Bowery-Fourth Ave.-Broadway to Madison Square Park
(23rd Street). The trail gets covered over by the street grid here;
you'll need to head up to Central Park North and St. Nicholas Avenue to
pick it up again. Walk up St. Nicholas to W. 169th Street; pick up
Broadway and take it over the Broadway Bridge into Marble Hill. At W.
230th Street you'll be leaving the legal jurisdiction of the Borough of
Manhattan and crossing into the Bronx. Call Lloyd Ultan -- he's the
Bronx Borough Historian.

Aug. 19 2010 07:58 PM
WNYC Newsroom

From Michael Miscione:

Reply to Jim from UWS: (Are there any good architecture tours of Manhattan - looking not at famous people's homes but at famous/interesting architecture? (similar to Brian Lemaire's question)

You asked about architecture tours of the city. I'm a little hesitant to
dive too deeply into this question because even though I know a lot of
tour guides, I have not taken everyone's tours. I don't know how much
they get into architecture or how good they are.

It should not be too hard to find the tours you are after with an
Internet search, or perhaps an inquiry into the metro New York chapter
of the American Institute of Architects, located in Greenwich Village.
They are very active with lectures, gallery shows and, yes, tours. Their
website is here: www.aiany.org

That said, there are two architectural historians whose names I will
drop with a clear conscience: Francis Morrone and Andrew Dolkart. They
are supremely knowledgeable, give excellent tours, and have assisted me
with architecture-related history inquiries whenever I've called upon
them. Their names will be no surprise to architectural history buffs, as
they are bold-faced names in the field. If you get an opportunity to
take a tour led by either of these gentlemen, do not hesitate to sign
up.

Aug. 19 2010 07:57 PM
WNYC Newsroom

From Michael Miscione:

Reply to Joe from South Park Slope, Brooklyn:

Good question. I don't know what became of the crowns that topped the
pickets of the Bowling Green fence. I've never seen a real one or an
authentic image of one.

I love that you've done your homework, contacting the three American
repositories that hold fragments of the King George statue, so I thought
I'd try a fourth resource for you, my colleague Jonathan Kuhn, Director
of Art & Antiquities for the NYC Department of Parks and Recreation.
Unfortunately, he drew a blank too, telling me, "We do not have any
crowns in our possession -- [which is not surprising] as the Parks
Department was founded nearly 100 years after their [presumed] removal
-- nor have I come across any elsewhere. And the oldest photos we have,
as well as others, don't seem to show any crowns on the fence." Sorry.

Aug. 19 2010 07:55 PM
WNYC Newsroom

From Michael Miscione:

Reply to Megan Taylor: (Why do the subway stations get smellier and dirtier the further south you go in Manhattan?)

Do the subway stations really get smellier and dirtier the further south
you go? Hmmm. My first instinct is to say it must be because you're
getting closer to Staten Island. (Only kidding! Only kidding! I love
Staten Island. Really, Tom, I do. It was a cheap shot and I apologize.)

But seriously, if you are right -- and I'm not saying you are -- I don't
think this is history question as much as it's a sociology or psychology
or even a geology question, so I'm going to pass on it.

Aug. 19 2010 07:53 PM
WNYC Newsroom

From Michael Miscione:

Reply to Colin: (There are a number of places that make some claim of being the oldest restaurant in New York (Ear Inn, Delmonico's, Bridge Cafe, etc.). What is the actual oldest restaurant in the city?)

The oldest restaurant? Sorry, I won't go there. And don't even think
about asking about the oldest bar. Or the "original" Ray's Pizza.

I have learned that there are a few surefire argument-starting topics in
the New York City history dodge, and those are three of them. Another
one I get all the time is, "What is the 'official' boundary line between
this neighborhood and that neighborhood?" Please.

I will not entertain any further comments or questions on the above
topics.

Aug. 19 2010 07:53 PM
Dave from Brooklyn

About 20 years ago, when I was living in Washington Heights, a friend and I were walking by a small park near Riverside Drive, where all the ramps to the George Washington Bridge begin, and we were alarmed to see what appeared to be a body wrapped in a rug in the small stand of woods that made up the park. We flagged down a policeman who investigated. He took a knife, slit open the carpet and started back violently, saying he saw hair. He looked closer and saw that it was a dog, not a human. Some time later I was walking by the park again and saw the Parks Department had put a sign up with the name of the park on it. The name was "Dead Dog Park!" I'd love to know how that park got it's name. Was I myself in at the kill, or is this a spot known as a place to lay beloved pets to rest?

Thanks!

Aug. 19 2010 06:27 PM
Colin

There are a number of places that make some claim of being the oldest restaurant in New York (Ear Inn, Delmonico's, Bridge Cafe, etc.). What is the actual oldest restaurant in the city?

Aug. 19 2010 11:48 AM
Joe from South Park Slope, Brooklyn

Hi Michael:

Here's one for you. Many are aware of what happened to the statue of King George III in Bowling Green on July 9, 1776, after Patriots heard the reading of the Declaration of Independence. They pulled the statue down and later Oliver Wolcott, Sr. chopped it up with an axe to make bullets with the help of his children. Pieces of the statue have turned up.

But another part of the this story is the cutting off of the cast iron crowns which ring the Bowling Green fence. This must not have been so easy: cast iron is far harder than lead to topple. Everyone knows of the irregular edges where they were cut off.

Now here is my question. I have inquired with NY Hist. Soc., Mus. of City of NY and a patriot society in CT. Have any of these original crowns ever turned up? As they were unsuitable to be melted down to make bullets, where did they go? I would love to see one, or at least a picture. Perhaps in one of the journal entries of July 9, there was a mention of what happened to the crowns.

Any idea? Surely the violent and impassioned "beheading" of the fence crowns, the greatest symbols of English rule, was one of the most powerful symbolic acts of Independence.

Aug. 18 2010 11:07 PM
Joe from South Park Slope, Brooklyn

Hi Michael:

Here's one for you. Many are aware of what happened to the statue of King George III in Bowling Green on July 9, 1776, after Patriots heard the reading of the Declaration of Independence. They pulled the statue down and later Oliver Wolcott, Sr. chopped it up with an axe to make bullets with the help of his children. Pieces of the statue have turned up.

But another part of the this story is the cutting off of the cast iron crowns which ring the Bowling Green fence. This must not have been so easy: cast iron is far harder than lead to topple. Everyone knows of the irregular edges where they were cut off.

Now here is my question. I have inquired with NY Hist. Soc., Mus. of City of NY and a patriot society in CT. Have any of these original crowns ever turned up? As they were unsuitable to be melted down to make bullets, where did they go? I would love to see one, or at least a picture. Perhaps in one of the journal entries of July 9, there was a mention of what happened to the crowns.

Any idea? Surely the violent and impassioned "beheading" of the fence crowns, the greatest symbols of English rule, was one of the most powerful symbolic acts of Independence.

Aug. 18 2010 11:06 PM
Mike from Inwood

At 216st and Broadway there is a two story high Roman style arch that appears to be 100+ years old. There is nothing behind the arch but a hill that now has apartment building sitting atop it. The arch is easily visible from the #1 train 215 St. elevated station platform. But it is harder to see from Broadway because newer, small commercial buildings have been built on to the arch's legs and the space under the arch is used for parking. My question is why was such an archetypally public structure built for private use? Or if it was built by the city, how and when was it transferred to private ownership?

Aug. 18 2010 06:41 PM
Jim from UWS

Are there any good architecture tours of Manhattan - looking not at famous people's homes but at famous/interesting architecture? (similar to Brian Lemaire's question)

Aug. 18 2010 01:18 PM
Geoff Hare from Manhattan temporarily (English)

Dear Michael
Is there a central record of deaths and places of burial (and indeed births) in New York and from when does it date? and how can the public get access? I have found the newspaper reports (NYTimes 1899) and parish records not always accurate in trying to trace families.

Thanks
Geoff

Aug. 18 2010 08:51 AM
liz

Is it true that Broadway used to be an Indian trail?

Aug. 18 2010 07:42 AM
progressive from Staten Island

The Farley Post Office, Macy's and Penn Station are built in the former African American Tenderloin neighborhood. Earlier, free Blacks were forced out of Five Points, and Lower Manhattan. Where did displaced African Americans relocate?

Aug. 17 2010 09:25 PM
Leniford from ny

what does bowling green mean did they really start ny stock exchange w/four people sitting on lawn at city hall whats the oldest records of residence on the island

Aug. 17 2010 05:34 PM
WNYC Newsroom

From Michael Miscione

Reply to James:

Part of West 138 St. was renamed to honor Odell M. Clark, a Harlem political strategist who served as chief of staff for the embattled U.S. congressman Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. Prior to his position with Powell, Clark worked for twenty years for the Amalgamated Laundry Workers Union. At the time of his death, in 1980, Clark headed the uptown office of Manhattan Borough President Andrew Stein.

Not coincidentally, the Abyssinian Baptist Church is located on Odell M. Clark Place. Clark was a longtime senior deacon at the church, where Powell -- and before that, his father Adam Clayton Powell, Sr. -- served as pastor.

An informative profile of Clark can be found in the May 11, 1967 issue of Jet Magazine, available online at Google books -- one of my all-time favorite research tools. Here is the link:

http://books.google.com/books?id=ProDAAAAMBAJ&lpg=PA6&dq=%22Odell%20clark%22&pg=PA6#v=onepage&q=%22Odell%20clark%22&f=false

Aug. 17 2010 01:08 PM
WNYC Newsroom

From Michael Miscione:

Reply to Norm Sherman:

Thank you for the invitation to speak to your group. I'll get in touch with you soon by phone to discuss the matter.

Aug. 17 2010 01:05 PM
WNYC Newsroom

From Michael Miscione:

Reply to Kathleen:

I'm afraid I can't help you. I have no information about the Cunningham family of Hamilton Heights. If you'd like to embark on your own research investigation I suggest you gather up as much detailed information as you can learn from your family records and lore -- things like dates, full names, and street addresses -- before you get started. The more definitive clues you begin with, the more paths you’ll be able to explore. Some of those paths will inevitably dead end, so it helps to have as many options as possible.

Armed with your information, head to the New York Public Library at Fifth Ave. and 42 St. in Manhattan. Proceed to Room 121 where you’ll find the Milstein Division of U.S. History, Local History & Genealogy. The good folks there can set you up with city directories, census records and the other tools you’ll need to find the missing pieces of your puzzle.

Here is a link to the Milstein Division:
http://www.nypl.org/locations/schwarzman/milstein-division-us-history-local-history-genealogy

Good luck!

Aug. 17 2010 01:04 PM
Norm Sherman from 33-60 21 Street, LIC

Dear Michael,
I organize a weekly Coffee Hour for the seniors in our two Long Island City co-ops. We are a NORC/SelfHelp. I would like to invite you to be one of our weekly Wednesday at 1:30 PM speakers. We are located in Long Island City at the intersection of 21 Street and 34th Avenue. We can provide a computer and LCD projector for your presentation.

Please call me at 917-584-8217 to set-up a date. It's also possible that some of our seniors would be interested in taking a walking tour with you.

I look forward to your phone call.
Sincerely,
Norm Sherman

Aug. 16 2010 08:19 PM
Megan Taylor

Why do the subway stations get smellier and dirtier the further south you go in Manhattan?

Aug. 16 2010 04:40 PM
James

why is west 138th street in Harlem called "Odell Clark Place"?

Aug. 16 2010 01:29 PM
Brian Lemaire

I understand that the lobby of the Standard Oil Building on Bowling Green is one of the great treasures of an earlier industrial age. Does anyone give guided tours of historical Manhattan sites that includes this building on their agenda, so we can get a look at the interior?

Aug. 16 2010 10:12 AM
Kathleen from Queens

Hi,

My great grandmother was a cook for the Cunningham family in Hamilton Heights. Do you have any information about this family and the address of their house?

Thanks for you help!

Aug. 16 2010 09:24 AM

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