Streams

Bloomberg Slices Into City's Managerial Practices

Monday, July 19, 2010

Mayor Michael Bloomberg's new plan to "consolidate and modernize back-office operations" may not sound sexy, but it could save the city $500 million by 2014 and $500 million every year after that.

The mayor's new plan to "consolidate and modernize back-office operations" may not sound sexy, but it could save the city 500 million dollars by 2014 and 500 million every year after that. 
The plan calls for better management of human resources, real estate, information technology, payments and collections, and the city's fleet of 26-thousand vehicles. 
Bloomberg says city government should be taking better care of the taxpayers, whose dollars make the system run

The plan calls for better management of human resources, real estate, information technology, payments and collections, as well as the city's fleet of 26,000 vehicles.

Bloomberg says city government should be taking better care of the taxpayers, whose dollars make the system run.

We're going to make government smaller, smarter, and fiscally sustainable. And just as we did with our schools, we're going to make sure our agencies are structured so they serve their customers first, and not their employees.]
The mayor says the plan would mean a loss of 3,000 jobs -- but only through attrition. 

"We're going to make government smaller, smarter and fiscally sustainable. And just as we did with our schools, we're going to make sure our agencies are structured to serve their customers first, and not their employees," Bloomberg says.

The mayor says the plan would mean a loss of 3,000 jobs -- but only through attrition.

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