Streams

Searching for a New Kidney

Monday, July 19, 2010

Daniel Asa Rose discusses the lengths he and his cousin Larry Feldman went to in order to get a kidney transplant. In Larry’s Kidney, Rose tells the story of helping his black-sheep cousin, who he hadn’t spoken to in 15 years, go to China and secure a kidney transplant, even though Chinese law forbids transplants to Westerners.

Guests:

Daniel Asa Rose

Comments [8]

Opted-out from Portland, OR

Rose said that under the system for which he advocates, "unless you explicitly opt-out of organ donation, you would be presumed to be a good citizen" who wants to do the right thing. (I'm paraphrasing.)

So all good citizens want their organs to be donated to others after their death? What about those of use who pay our taxes, share generously our money and volunteer time with those less fortunate, and make sacrifices in our daily lives for the greater good -- but who do not believe in organ donation as a legitimate, cost-effective medical practice? Are we not "good citizens"?

The tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars which are spent on a single transplant operation would, in my opinion, be better spent, say, purchasing thousands of mosquito nets to protect countless children from malaria. My medical directive explicitly excludes organ transplant because I'm not selfish enough to wish for my own life to be prolonged at such a huge cost to society. I guess that in opting out of both sides of these exchanges, I'm just not a "good citizen".

Jul. 19 2010 01:58 PM
Opted-out from Portland, OR

Rose said that under the system for which he advocates, "unless you explicitly opt-out of organ donation, you would be presumed to be a good citizen" who wants to do the right thing. (I'm paraphrasing.)

So all good citizens want their organs to be donated to others after their death? What about those of use who pay our taxes, share generously our money and volunteer time with those less fortunate, and make sacrifices in our daily lives for the greater good -- but who do not believe in organ donation as a legitimate, cost-effective medical practice? Are we not "good citizens"?

The tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars which are spent on a single transplant operation would, in my opinion, be better spent, say, purchasing thousands of mosquito nets to protect countless children from malaria. My medical directive explicitly excludes organ transplant because I'm not selfish enough to wish for my own life to be prolonged at such a huge cost to society. I guess that in opting out of both sides of these exchanges, I'm just not a "good citizen".

Jul. 19 2010 01:07 PM
John from Staten Island

For those of us who have suffered at the hands of the US medical establishment, I totally object to any new "opt out" organ donation initiative. We should rights to our own bodies without assuming they can take our organs.

Jul. 19 2010 01:00 PM
Matthew Moshen from Great Neck, NY

As a three-time heart transplant recipient, I am looking forward to reading this book for laughs and to help promote!

Jul. 19 2010 12:59 PM
Amy from Manhattan

...and much more seriously, if the author can be sure if the kidney his cousin got was donated voluntarily.

Jul. 19 2010 12:57 PM
Amy from Manhattan

I'm waiting to hear if there's any connection to the rabbi who was an organ broker in the NJ (by way of Brooklyn) scandal.

Jul. 19 2010 12:56 PM
Sally from Jersey City

Where did he get this kidney from? Was this harvested?

Jul. 19 2010 12:55 PM

Larry sounds like the kind of person I've always found fascinating and utterly mystifying. I've met people who manage to live like him — as your guest says, seat of the pants, by the skin of his teeth.

I admire them (from afar) as true survivors. Larry would have been played by Jerry Orbach in the movie.

This character is loved in fiction — in Dickens, Woody Allen, Hunter Thompson . . . .

What a story.

Jul. 19 2010 12:53 PM

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