Streams

Bump-and-Run Q&A

Thursday, July 15, 2010

Have you ever hit a parked car?  Or been on the receiving end?  What did you do – and what does the law say you should do?

In light of State Senator Schneiderman’s fender-bender-hit-and-run, we want to hear your stories.  Attorney Jeffrey Levine also joins to answer your traffic law questions.  

Guests:

Jeffrey Levine
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Comments [24]

Ben from nyc

To Becky - please re-read my entire repsonse about the speed limit. I did say "30 mph" on the second line. It's not 35 as you thought, although the NYC police commissioner didn't know the answer back in 1993 either...

http://www.streetsblog.org/2009/07/20/does-ray-kelly-know-the-speed-limit-now/

Jul. 16 2010 10:15 AM
Peter Joseph from Brooklyn

According to the Car Talk guys, the process of using the bumpers of cars in front of and behind to guide you into a parking space is known as the "Braille Method."

Jul. 16 2010 02:06 AM
The Truth from Becky

Tomayto, Tomahto Mike....it is still not "drive as fast as you want" like Ben said...which by the by is who I was speaking to.

Jul. 15 2010 01:20 PM
Mike from Inwood

The Truth from Becky claims: "If there is no speed limit sign the spreed limit is 35."

I think I remember from my high school drivers' education class that in New York State the speed limit, unless posted otherwise, is 30 mph within any city or village. Otherwise, it's 55 mph. Of course, always drive at a prudent speed, even if the limit is higher.

Jul. 15 2010 12:39 PM
Mike from Inwood

When I first moved to NYC shortly after the market crashed in 1987, I returned to my curb-parked 1986 Mazda 323 (with its Ronald-Reagan-approved bumpers capable of withstanding a 2.5 mph crash) to find that an older Lincoln Towncar with its rock solid bumpers had almost parked me in. While doing the 25 point turn to get out, I touched his bumper. There was a child in his car (probably around 6 years old) who appeared terrified as I approached his car. There was no damage to either car and I drove away. Several weeks later, I received a letter at my old address claiming thousands of dollars of damage and demanding immediate payment or else some unspecified action would be taken. Since I didn't want to have to deal the alternate-side parking and couldn't afford the car and insurance payments, I'd already sold the car, so I ignored what seemed to be an obviously fraudulent claim, although I worried that he'd still be able to track me down. I never did hear back from the guy and about a year later I found his letter while going through some papers. It was written on stationary that provided daytime contact information. Over the next few weeks, I called the guy a couple of times late at night from a pay phone and left a message asking him whether he was sure he really knew where his boy was. I know to many parents this will seem a bit over the top, but frankly I thought his attempt to extort money from me when I had none had added a lot of unecessarily stress to my life.

Jul. 15 2010 12:31 PM
John from Staten Island

Back in March a Sanitation truck hit someone's parked SUV and didn't leave a note either. Thank you NYC.

http://www.silive.com/news/index.ssf/2010/03/sanitation_rats_caught_in_the.html

Jul. 15 2010 12:04 PM
The Truth from Becky

Ben are you nuts?? If there is no speed limit sign the spreed limit is 35.

Jul. 15 2010 12:03 PM
The Truth from Becky

Karen you are the problem! You said run away because that was what you did and you were just exposed by your subconscious. Also, careful what you wish onto other people sweetie, you yourself could be making a pillow out of your own dashboard someday.

Jul. 15 2010 12:02 PM
loverof music

don't remember the female caller's name "that the price of doing business in NY": her statement/attitude/outlook/irresponsibility is the very reason as to why society seems to be dominated by the lowest common denominators. She should learn how to park and probably drive with respect to fellow motorists. When she comes outside one day to find her bumper hanging from the body of her car, she should rejoice and say that's price for doing business in NY. I wonder if she also sits on stranger's cars as if they're public benches....

Jul. 15 2010 12:01 PM
Tom from Williamsburg

I have a motorcycle and I can't tell how many time my bike has been knocked over and damaged!

Jul. 15 2010 11:59 AM
Karen from NYC

I meant "started to walk away." The guy ran after me.

Jul. 15 2010 11:58 AM
Mike from Inwood

$3000 worth of damage for a barely noticeable bump? Sounds like fraud to me. This is a good reason to keep a compact camera to document what happens.

Jul. 15 2010 11:58 AM
John from Staten Island

Recent caller is just giving excuses for unlawful behavior in New York - Tap method. Give me a break.

Jul. 15 2010 11:57 AM
Nick from UWS

What complete idiot decided that bumpers should be made out of plastic? How stupid can something be?

Jul. 15 2010 11:57 AM
Nick from UWS

What complete idiot decided that bumpers should be made out of plastic? How stupid can something be?

Jul. 15 2010 11:56 AM
Zak from Washington Heights

It's New York. Who drives?

Jul. 15 2010 11:56 AM
Karen from NYC

Why I Hate The Rich Jerks Who've Taken Over East Hampton:

A few years ago, I drove into town from Springs to buy a book, leaving my 14-year old son and his friend in our rented bungalow. While parking my car, I backed into a guy's front fender. I got out, checked the fender, saw zero -- as in "not a bit" of damage, parked my car and started to run away.

A Wall Street type stopped me and began screaming that I'd hit his car. I showed him his fender -- no damage -- and left. The idiot called the cops, who ambushed me at Bookhampton. We all marched back to the lot, where I showed them that, not only was the buy's bumper not damaged -- it was dusty (meaning undisturbed).

I don't know what agenda this Mercedes owner had -- maybe a phony insurance claim to get an upgrade -- but the cops weren't happy with him. If he's listening to the show -- I hope he lost all his money last year and is now living in his ugly car.

Jul. 15 2010 11:55 AM
The Truth from Becky

NY is the only place where they have such trashy cars and such cavalier attitudes towards the upkeep of their vehicles. Woe be unto anyone who buys a used vehicle that was driven in NY!!

Atlanta, Florida, California - ALL care about the condition of their vehicles.

Jul. 15 2010 11:55 AM
Lorraine from Morristown

A parked car's tail light was damaged when my daughter opened the back door of my car in a parking lot. I struggled with what to do but had to leave a note. It was the right thing to do and it showed my daughter that we have to own up to these accidents.

Jul. 15 2010 11:54 AM
Lana from SI

I left my car parked and came to find it completely missing the bumper. I guess my story is a bit more than a bump and run. There was over $7000 in damage. I looked for a note and maybe even an eye witness. Unfortunately, no note or any eye witness. I was angry. I am still angry and if I could find the person who did it, I would let him/her hear it.

Jul. 15 2010 11:54 AM
Elaine from Bronx

I live in the Bronx and I actually came outside to see my car had been hit. No note was left. There is a place by my house where commercial trucks come and go and I suspect it was one of the trucks that hit my car. The owner didnt claim responsibility, so I had to pay out of pocket.

Jul. 15 2010 11:54 AM
Mark

This is great:

http://failblog.org/2009/05/07/double-fail-3/

Jul. 15 2010 11:54 AM
Ben from manhattan

If there's no speed limit sign, you can drive as fast as you want, especially in residential neighborhoods. Actually, I think it's 30 mph.

Jul. 15 2010 10:52 AM
John from Staten Island

If a speed limit sign is not posted on NYC streets is there a designated speed limit by law?

Jul. 15 2010 10:14 AM

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