Streams

Fox to the Mideast; Xinhua to the West?

Wednesday, July 14, 2010

Two recent stories exemplify the way in which mass media is moving in to unlikely territory. Keach Hagey, media blogger at Politico and former reporter at The National, an english-language paper based in Abu Dahbi, discusses what we do and don't know about reports that Saudi Prince Alwaleed is teaming with Fox to start a mideast news channel. And Christina Larson, editor at Foreign Policy and fellow at the New America Foundation dicusses Xinhua, one of China's main state-run media outlets, and their efforts to expand in the US and around the world.

Guests:

Keach Hagey and Christina Larson
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Comments [9]

ruth from NYC

I called into the show challenging your Politico reporter on facts. The Koran IS the constitution in Saudi Arabia. You asked, but did not let me answer, why Murdoch? Murdoch is an Obama supporter. Roger Ailes is the only thing standing between the Arab lobby and free speech. David Remnick writes about it in The Bridge. Please, please have reporters who know the facts. Thanks.

Jul. 14 2010 04:31 PM
Carol Haber from forest hills, queens

One thing to remember above all: The idea of freedom of the press is not really understood by many foreign cultures and countries. If they hear it on public media, they assume it's okayed by the government. Even telling them the press is "free" is not understandable to them. So their idea of putting out "news" is different from ours. We can try to correct it by participating with them but I'm concerned we'll be too solicitous and not firm enough since money is involved--our big weakness.

Jul. 14 2010 11:38 AM
g.e.Taylor from Brooklyn Heights

No problems with Sharia Law propaganda on this channel - we're too worried with Prospect Park geese being sent to "Auschwitz" without a public hearing.
(is it O.K. if the geese get a hearing first?)
Have you no decency !?

Jul. 14 2010 11:30 AM
Unheard from NYC

Who's afraid of the big bad wolf? Giuliani should have taken that Ten Mil. The ultimate American value is Profit.

Jul. 14 2010 11:27 AM
tom from qns

Hey reporters! Try this: Wear your Tiananiman Square tee-shirts when you visit the Chinese 'news' offices in our Times Square.

Jul. 14 2010 11:25 AM
Matt

Rupert Murdoch a breath of fresh air? That would be a funny name for his memoirs.

Does this woman who says "everything in the Middle East has a political bent" read Al-Jazeera? Or just going by what gets printed in the press here about it?

Jul. 14 2010 11:23 AM
stuart from Jerusalem

hmm - a middle eastern caller wondering about 'zionist propaganda'

soooooo suprising!!!

don't forget about jews using muslim blood for matzah, my friend...

Jul. 14 2010 11:21 AM
Peter from Crown Heights

This is interesting. In my experience part of the failure of Chinese propaganda is that it's so tightly held that you can read the intent of a media policy directive by taking into account the mass-action of all media servicing the same story simultaneously.

I wonder if an isolated outlet in a more diverse media landscape will be more successful at getting it's message out.

Jul. 14 2010 11:17 AM
adsf

xinhua will very quickly become the official source of information for nyc based reporters trying to cover business (and politics) in china. how truly convenient for them. i've long believed that official data and positions and other information should be produced by a us govt. news agency, leaving "real" reporters to do the reporting, the investigating, the questioning, rather than feeling like woodward and berstein for emailing a few fifa requests.

i do also hope that the ny-based journalist community recognizes that joining their ranks will be Communist Party members, as xinhua agents are, and proudly so.

Jul. 14 2010 10:55 AM

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