Streams

Higher MTA Fares and Service Cuts

Wednesday, March 25, 2009

Sound off in the comments below: 'How would higher fares and service cuts affect you?'

exit doors

The MTA votes in favor of higher fares and service cuts:

Don't like the 25 percent fare and toll hikes, and the service cuts, approved by the MTA's board today? MTA CEO Lee Sander says, write to your state senator. “We certainly urge New Yorkers to reach out to their elected officials and impress upon them the importance of what we are dealing with here, the impact on New Yorkers and the future of the region.'

By a 12 to 1 vote, the MTA Board voted to impose fare and toll hikes, bus and subway service cuts, and layoffs, in a budget that bridges a $1.2 billion gap. Before the vote, Chairman Dale Hemmerdinger thanked the media for its coverage. “In the end you reached the conclusion that the situation is exactly what we've said it is: a true crisis that cannot be solved by ourselves without causing great pain to the riding public,” he said.

Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver said, 'The MTA is not bluffing. The failure to act now would be an unmitigated disaster for millions of New Yorkers.'

MTA officials still hold out hope that Senate Democratic Majority Leader Malcolm Smith and six other Democratic senators will have a last-minute change of heart, and back a rescue plan that includes controversial tolls on East and Harlem River bridges.

Several Democratic state senators have so far opposed a bailout. Democratic State Senator Carl Kruger of Brooklyn opposes a rescue plan, because it includes new bridge tolls and a new payroll tax. While he says straphangers will find it painful to pay $5 a day to get to and from work, he's defending his stance. He says the MTA is so mismanaged, it needs to be forced to streamline its operations.

'It's not gonna end at $5, they same way it wasn't going to end with the proposal that the MTA had,' says Kruger. 'They should care why the property that was held by the taxpayers of this region is being treated as somebody's private piggy bank.'

Bronx Senator Pedro Espada offered this message to straphangers. 'Don't panic, we will come through with operating subsidies,' says Espada. 'We will come through with capitol dollars, but the MTA must also come through with a capitol plan to show us before we fund it.'

In a statement, Senate Republican Minority Leader Dean Skelos laid the blame for the MTA's actions on Democrats, calling their closed door meetings a 'disgrace.'

The new fares will start May 31st, and the service cuts and layoffs will be rolled out over the next few months.

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Commuters aren't thrilled about paying more for transit. WNYC was at the Atlantic-Pacific transit hub this morning during rush hour:

Nisam Lessane, who lives and works in Brooklyn, may stop riding the trains altogether:

Melissa Otero, who takes the train four times a day, says she has no choice but to pay more:

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Comments [54]

Lisa

You can email a complaint to keyplayers - their email addy's are here:
http://boycottmta.com/put-pressure-on-the-state-legislature/

My husband and I are a mid-upper income family and while we are not getting one cent increased in our salaries, we are somehow expected to keep up with all the cost of living increases to survive. We are being squeezed in every area of the economy while we continue to see our property value drop – my husband has been laid off and forced to freelance. My job has freezed my salary and cut out overtime pay. Hello, we are in a recession! Families are barely getting by - where does the MTA expect us to magically come up with another $82 per person to get to work each month? It's enough to make us consider leaving the state.

And what are we getting in return for the fare increase? Reduced service. Filthy subways. The MetroNorth trains are freezing cold all winter, the screeching door closing sounds are awful. Seriously, give people a break!

Apr. 13 2009 04:05 PM
Mellisa

Most importantly, we are planning on boycotting all MTA services on June 1st, 2009 for 23 days. If you can only do it one day or a few days, so be it. Please join us.

Apr. 05 2009 12:14 PM
Mellisa

Ok, the June 9th boycott was from 2008. June 9th, 2009 is a Tuesday. The MTA officially raises the fare on May 31st, 2009, so it goes into effect on Monday June 1st, 2009. Please visit our website at boycottmta.com, or join us on facebook at http://www.facebook.com/home.php?#/event.php?eid=67056081691. We are planning a massive boycott of all MTA services. We will be updating our website often with alternative ways to get to work. Please join us, we need our voices to be heard

Apr. 05 2009 12:13 PM
HappyDogNyc

Why does the MTA always claim they are broke? Since moving to Brooklyn in 2001 the most noticeable changes in the subway system seem to be the elimination of tellers, the elimination of the tokens, and the fare hikes soon to be up to $2.50. I remember when the MTA was caught a few years ago keeping two sets of books, one to display to the public and the media, and the other a secret version showing the MTA had a surplus of cash. In this new economy we cannot continue to fund this type of ruthless corruption. It only takes a few minutes to jot off an email or write a letter to your local congressman and/or senator. In this way you can do more in a few minutes than you could through years of complaining to people that cannot do anything about it.

HappyDogNYC.com

Apr. 01 2009 03:29 PM
Leba

I am a student in Baltimore considering a move back to my native Brooklyn this summer. I am currently visually impaired which makes it impossible for me to drive a car or even ride a bike. The current state of MTA's pricing in New York vs. MTA (Maryland) pricing in Baltimore almost makes me laugh (or cry) of frustration. A one-day pass in Baltimore costs $3.60, which covers the Metro and all buses within the city for a full day. The Metro may not go everywhere, but it runs regularly and efficiently. Most of the buses are efficient, clean and pleasant as well. It's disturbing that the great state of NY can not match the pricing or efficiency of the smaller, more car-friendly city of Baltimore, MD.

Mar. 29 2009 11:32 AM
tom banks

Do not use any of the MTA services on June 9th. No mass transit, tolled bridges, tunnels... As true New Yorkers; we should take part in the boycott in support for all. We must do what we can to get the entire city involve in this boycott.. Get a copy of the article and distribute to the public, email, blog, post, reach out to marketing companies in NY, put it into translation for the ones who do not speak english. We must do whatever it takes to get the information out.

Mar. 29 2009 08:47 AM
tom banks

MTA Boycott: June 09, 2009. For a copy of the boycott article send and email to saynotomta4@aol.com. A rally is also being scheduled if you will like information on the rally, please mention so in your e-mail.

Mar. 29 2009 08:39 AM
Ruben Safir

The Plan The City Needs to Save The MTA

The MTA can easily cut out the LIRR to Grand Central Station program which will cost US 15.2 billion dollars, and then use that money for its operations, and debt service. The choices being presented to the City are false. We don't have to choose between Tolls or service cuts and fare hikes. We can just spend less on massive additional projects that the system doesn't need.

Instead of the Grand Central LIRR program, we can save the 15.2 billion dollars, maintain service and give LIRR riders free transfers at Atlantic Avenue to the subway, while retaining the Pen station subway fare. Trains on the IRT can start at Atlantic Avenue which has the subway capacity. That will encourage riders to use the under utilized Brooklyn LIRR Terminal ending any need for an LIRR extension and providing full service for everyone. Simple enough? Not if you work for Bloomberg and want to use the MTA as a wedge to get tolls on the Brooklyn Bridge.

Mar. 29 2009 03:31 AM
bobprevidi

The MTA does not make money.
This RE transfer tax kept it going.
Since that bottom fell out of RE so is the ability for the MTA to take care of its finances.
That is not the MTA managments doing - point that finger back at you and your political leadership. Even if you wiped out the entire management structure you still could not pay for the deficit problem. Mass transit is treated like a step child in a city and state that should be leading the way nationwide. Now we have Obama ready to help - and we are worried about tolls.
silly. very silly. There is a much larger picture that involves our economic well being, our health, quality of life, dependence on oil, reducing ghg, I could go on an on, but we hold our tolls down. Not the big picture - long term solution we need. We can argue about where the toll money goes, but we should be trying to make driving less attractive so we can get cars off the streets. That is what the goal should be. We are NYC not America. We are a dense urban environment and if we openned our eyes we could lead - not choke on traffic like everyone else in the nation.

Mar. 27 2009 08:00 AM
Ruben Safir

The MTA has bit off more than we can afford and doesn’t need my bridges.
It needs to scale back its plans and restrict its programs to projects
that NYC can afford.

Since it doesn’t come under anyones jurisdiction, it won’t do that.
Instead to uses the agency for pork barrel politics around the region
and picks on the weakest hand in its grip, the outer boroughs of NYC, to
exploit for its own unneeded agenda.

It doesn’t need a 15.2 billion dollar east side access program for the
LIRR. Scratch that off the list, and the Fulton Street program and the
pork west side extension that was traded for a westside stadium project,
and the MTA has a surplus.

So they are lying to us. Plane and simple.

Mar. 27 2009 05:31 AM
Alex

Racketeering at its finest.....

At this point I am beyond outrage!!!! I say let us go on strike against the MTA for a week or more. Let's block every station and let them ride on empty!!!

Has anyone heard anything about MTA employees taking a pay cut like most of New Yorkers did. Let them take 10% pay cut as well. Also lets have them pay for their health insurance like everyone else does. THE TIME TO DO SOMETHING IS NOW!!!

WE THE PEOPLE must stop this now or we are always will be a victim of this unpunishable crime.

Mar. 26 2009 11:02 AM
Ruth

I am an intern at New York Presbyterian and we are unable to hold jobs during our internship, not only is there not extra money for us federally (we can't even get financial aid of any kind) but now when we have to travel to the different locations across the city, we will be shelling out extra money for travel. Especially when walking isn't an option to travel from campus to campus.
There are many students who have to commute by bus or subway and we don't even get a fair word in with the government because we do not vote for them.
Here's to the recession (Cough*depression*cough) and constant living beyond our means.

Mar. 25 2009 06:16 PM
LET

I get a freeze on my raise and then the MTA raises their costs. Excuse me, ridership was up in 2008! Someone better check into those books! My bus to the subway is a commute beyond words, that is if you get in the bus at all. And they want to cut services!!

Mar. 25 2009 03:41 PM
Gianni

Not only do I have to pay $20 more for the subway, it will also cost me $103 more per month on Metro North into the city. The poorly managed MTA gets a 25% increase from me and my company will not give out raises this year stating ...We are among many employers who have made similar decisions or taken more far-reaching actions as a result of the current economic climate.
The MTA need an overhaul ov their management. They have the bullet train in Asia & Europe and in NY we have40 year old broken down diesel trains that take longer and longer to get to and from NYC.

Mar. 25 2009 03:25 PM
James

I'm a taxi driver, so I might get more business; unless, of course, people start to avoid coming into Manhattan unnecessarily.

Mar. 25 2009 02:12 PM
gene

in response to your on-air call for thoughts on what the fare hikes mean to me, i say this:

it means voting against the bums in our state senate. if they can't be moved to vote against these increases, then we must move them out of their cozy offices.

Mar. 25 2009 02:11 PM
Joseph

I am a sole proprietor of a small glass business in lower Manhattan.
I will be riding my bike much more often, riding along the West Side bike path is safe,
fairly quick, plus you get a great workout.

You can expect a bike ridership increase this spring and summer.

Mar. 25 2009 02:11 PM
Ken

Although my elected representatives seem to want me and everyone else to drive and take advantage of the free bridges, I’ll be biking even more than I do now. But the air I breathe will be dirtier and the threat level higher as the fare increase and service cuts inevitably prompt some to abandon mass transit for the car.

I also will happily take part in a campaign to unseat the "Fare Hike Four," the four state senators from the Bronx, Queens and Brooklyn who have rejected the interests of the overwhelming majority of their constituents and instead sided with a small, privileged and wealthier minority in opposing tolling the bridges.

And, finally, I will continue to wonder why New York's major media outlets, including WNYC, barely mentioned these senators' peculiar position, never asked why, and never called them to account. It goes to show that when it comes to taking a privilege away from motorists, all bets are off.

Mar. 25 2009 02:10 PM
Maria

I have to say this is not that big of a deal for me because I will just be slightly less likely to take the subway than I am already, which is not very. I ride my bike partly because the subways and buses are a mess. They are so badly run even all the drivers don't care. The buses need to take dollar bills, and be scheduled to hit the middle of their runs at even intervals rather than the beginnings (which just leads to all the buses getting backed up into one clump on the route I use).
They need to make it so people can switch from one subway line to another at any point they cross rather than only at certain stations (34th st, for example), and they need to have monitors in the stations with service updates. Also why is the MTA so strapped to make itself work all the time? If the government is spending money to stimulate the economy, what city is more important to have running smoothly than New York? If everyone has to allow the maximum possible amount of time the MTA could take for their commute or risk being late, a lot of people are wasting a lot of time. Furthermore all the traffic problems make it impossible for the least expensive forms of traffic, like bikes and buses, to get through town. The city should be doing more to reduce car traffic, including tolls, more bike lanes, no public parking, and enforcement of moving violations.
They should also set the tone of traffic safety by ensuring all public sector vehicle drivers are safe and courteous. Thanks, MW Brooklyn 20 minutes from Manhattan by bike, 45 minutes+ by MTA

Mar. 25 2009 02:09 PM
Jen

Instead of raising the subway fare 50 cents - that's a LOT - go back to charging to take the Staten Island Ferry 25 cents. Who is THAT going to hurt? I mean, really?

Mar. 25 2009 02:08 PM
Kris

I get a sinking feeling that we are all just waiting for the next piece of bad news that is finally the straw that breaks the already overtaxed middle class's back.

It's outrageous that we who are already going to bear the brunt of the bailout are now being asked to give even more, and very directly. Is there no money in the stimulus to alleviate this? It's not like those of us who use public transportation are really in a position to cough up an extra $240 a year!

By using public transportation we help to cut down on city pollution, we avoid the use of foreign oil, the list goes on and on.. Yet we choose to tax the subways first. Not the bridges with the cars and traffic and pollution and accidents....

Mar. 25 2009 11:54 AM
carrie walker

I'm a student with a set budget for the semester. Higher fees for commuting just means I deduct that amount from another part of my spending (i.e. food/school supplies)

Mar. 25 2009 11:10 AM
Theodore

This is an outrage. I blame Albany politcos and their motorhead mentality. This city needs affordable, reliable, clean, efficient mass transit. Go to any other major city in almost any country and it is cheaper and better than NYC Mess Transit. It's an outrage in this day with the push for a greener world. The joe schmoe is yet again taken for a ride. What recourse do we have?
P.S. - Sorry, forgot to tell you great post!

Mar. 25 2009 11:01 AM
akapluto

this is seriously the most ridiculous thing ive ever heard (even moreso than the last three price hikes). wtf does bloomberg DO all day???

Mar. 25 2009 11:00 AM
Theodore

This is an outrage. I blame Albany politcos and their motorhead mentality. This city needs affordable, reliable, clean, efficient mass transit. Go to any other major city in almost any country and it is cheaper and better than NYC Mess Transit. It's an outrage in this day with the push for a greener world. The joe schmoe is yet again taken for a ride. What recourse do we have?

Mar. 25 2009 10:41 AM
Joe

I bike to work and almost everywhere else, so this doesn't really affect me much. I have noticed lately that people have started to ask me "how to" questions about commuting on two wheels, and several have said that they're about to start biking soon.

Is the MTA still under the influence of Pataki's goal of self-supporting mass-transit while motorists are subsidized? What a shame that our metropolitan transportation policy has to be determined by whole-state authorities.

Mar. 25 2009 10:12 AM
Serena

I am looking for a bicycle and I will adapt my business wardrobe.

Mar. 25 2009 09:29 AM
Mandy

So many have already said it. I, too, don't know how I am going to manage. I work in NYC and take MetroNorth, the New Haven line which is a cesspool of filth, too few cars and broken machinery and I pay through the nose for it. I make a very, very modest salary at a non-profit that has not gone up in ten years. I have no idea how I am going to pay for this rate hike. I have cut back on everything in the past couple of years but now I am facing having to let go of my telephone service. I no longer take the car anywhere except errands, I don't go out much maybe once a month. It is infuriating that these four b*******s can block raising the bridge fares - they are definitely pandering to the more well-off in their districts. Those of us who do not have much, will now have less, and with nothing to show for it. No improvement in service, no improvement anywhere. It's shameful and disgusting.

Mar. 25 2009 09:16 AM
joanna

Two questions:

How come our elected representitives in Washington couldn't convince their colleagues that maintaining and improving the country's largest mass transportation system in the country's least car dependent city was a worthy infurstructue investment? (How hard did they try?)

HOW CAN THE MTA STILL BE IN CHARGE OF ANYTHING???

Mar. 25 2009 09:11 AM
Mark

The State Assembly couldn't be bothered to even vote on congestion pricing. They threw away over $300 million from the feds. They said they'd offer alternatives...I guess their alternative is to encourage more people to drive. What a bunch of jerks. I encourage everyone to vote these backward thinking people out of office.

Mar. 25 2009 09:07 AM
Charles N

I am deeply concerned that the disability "mess" that is costing the MTA system so much has not been addressed prior to raising transit fares. I read about it in the New York Tinmes and was shocked. When are the regular residents of NYC going to be put above drivers? We all share in the costs of their choosing to drive to NYC.Also each bridge tunnel to NYC should be equally priced. It seems ridiculous that you can enter the island for one price at one bridge/tunnel and at another price elsewhere.

Mar. 25 2009 09:00 AM
Matt

I don't understand Jennifer's comment (#2 above). If it won't make sense for you to buy a 30-day card post-hike, then it doesn't make sense now. Right now, you need to use it 41 times to make it worth your money: $2 * 41 = $82.

After the increase, it will be nominally different: $103 / $2.50 = 41.2.

Can someone explain why that 1/5 ride difference will make the new unlimited card not worth it?

Mar. 25 2009 08:31 AM
Alexandra

Why don't we just charge all the students who receive free metrocards a $1 I see these junior high schoolers and high schoolers spending so much money on snacks everyday. If they can afford $5 for snacks, they can afford $2 a day on fare. It'll also be better for their health! I am so tired of the MTA raising their fairs. How can they be in a deficit when ridership is at an all time high. This is such BS! Doesn't anyone remember when they had two books, one that said they were in a deficit and the other that said they were in a surplus?

Mar. 25 2009 08:13 AM
Tracy

I will definitely take the bus and train less often. Currently, I can be a frequent rider for short jaunts, as it is convenient and worthwhile to jump on MTA, but I will walk and bike more, or save on trips by combining errands. (That admittedly means less incidental shopping, which is great for my pocket book but not great for city businesses and city tax revenue.) Nonetheless, I have a strict weekly budget and these trips add up. I imagine many others are in my same position.

Unfortunately, the increase in fares will also undermine the cities push towards 'greening' transportation and sway commuters further away from mass transit. While funds may be needed to improve the lines and cover debt, there should be no increase in fares...for now. People's pocket books and psyche can't handle it. The better long-run plan is to invest in improvements and internal cuts, and lure the masses of MTA riders needed to foot more of the bill.

Mar. 25 2009 08:12 AM
Gene

I think people need to look a wider snapshot then the present. What has the MTA done over the past few years to the fare. I think then people will be really shocked. I moved to Long Island in 01. My LIRR monthly cost $200, in 02 they changed my zone from 9 to 10 and increased me to $250. Since then my monthly has increased to $267. With a potential 25% rate increase I am looking at a monthly at $333. This is a 66% increase in my monthly fare since 01. I wish my salary increase by half that percentage.

The MTA needs to look inward for savings. With 90% of those that retire from the LIRR receiving disability pay and employees not working full shifts and getting paid for it I think the MTA has no right to increase the monthly fare. Make the MTA employees pay for their trips on the LIRR and make their benefits in line with corporate America. I wish I can charge my clients 66% more for my services but them competition would take them away!

About the employees not working their full shifts, there are many conductors that do a round trip and go home, but get paid for 8. They talk about it openly and brag about. Nice!

Mar. 25 2009 07:45 AM
judith

Because of the fare hikes I will not be able to afford to use the train as much as I do. So they are, effectively, going to loose money by trying to get more.
I live and do some of my work in Brooklyn and will just do less in Manhattan because of this.
It is going to hurt the economy in all the boros since fewer people will come to BAM, for example, and I know I will do less in the Manhattan...why go to Queens or Bx ?? Why go to Norwalk to see friends on Metro North...it is going to kill mobility not help it...hurt the economy not help it.

Mar. 25 2009 07:41 AM
Elissa

I agree with Elena. I bike most days, though I still spend around $40 a month on the MTA, for times when weather/illness/events/laziness make biking less preferable... But I'm healthy enough that I can bike closer to 100% of the time, and will be doing so but I've met many people who can't. As Elena stated, seniors, families, children, the infirm... lets add the drunk who are annoying on the train but should be there instead of on bike or car... A hike punishes only the vulnerable these same people who can't hoof it/bike it around are usually the same people who have no more give in their budgets.

Mar. 25 2009 07:38 AM
John

When do the 30 days of a 30 Metrocard begin? Date of purchase of first swipe? If its really first swipe, I could see it being worth it to buy a few now and save them for the following months.

Mar. 25 2009 07:34 AM
MW

I have to say this is not that big of a deal for me because I will just be slightly less likely to take the subway than I am already, which is not very. I ride my bike partly because the subways and buses are a mess. They are so badly run even all the drivers don't care. The buses need to take dollar bills, and be scheduled to hit the middle of their runs at even intervals rather than the beginnings (which just leads to all the buses getting backed up into one clump on the route I use).
They need to make it so people can switch from one subway line to another at any point they cross rather than only at certain stations (34th st, for example), and they need to have monitors in the stations with service updates. Also why is the MTA so strapped to make itself work all the time? If the government is spending money to stimulate the economy, what city is more important to have running smoothly than New York? If everyone has to allow the maximum possible amount of time the MTA could take for their commute or risk being late, a lot of people are wasting a lot of time. Furthermore all the traffic problems make it impossible for the least expensive forms of traffic, like bikes and buses, to get through town. The city should be doing more to reduce car traffic, including tolls, more bike lanes, no public parking, and enforcement of moving violations. They should also set the tone of traffic safety by ensuring all public sector vehicle drivers are safe and courteous.

Thanks, MW Brooklyn
20 minutes from Manhattan by bike, 45 minutes+ by MTA

Mar. 25 2009 07:33 AM
Ken

Although my elected representatives seem to want me and everyone else to drive and take advantage of the free bridges, I’ll be biking even more than I do now. But the air I breathe will be dirtier and the threat level higher as the fare increase and service cuts invevitably prompt some to abandon mass transit for the car.

I also will happily take part in a campaign to unseat the "Fare Hike Four," the four state senators from the Bronx, Queens and Brooklyn who have rejected the interests of the overwhelmong majority of their constituents and instead sided with a small, privileged and wealthier minority in opposing tolling the bridges.

And, finally, I will continue to wonder why New York's major media outlets, including WNYC, barely mentioned these senators' peculiar position, never asked why, and never called them to account. It goes to show that when it comes to taking a privilege away from motorists, all bets are off.

Ken, Upper West Side

Mar. 25 2009 07:31 AM
Lynn

The raised fares are a reality check New Yorkers. Lets cut the outcry and do our homework. Compare subway fares in other major cities....

In Paris a single ride ticket costs EUR 1.60 or $2.18

In London a monthly fare is between GBP 99 and GBP 261... that's $145 and $382 for a service that is not as good as New York's subway. London subways are not airconditioned, have fewer trains, are much more crowded.

You get what you pay for.

Mar. 25 2009 07:28 AM
Elena

I'll ride my bike full-time (I currently ride about 75% of the time), but I worry about people who aren't as mobile as me (seniors, families with children). They are going to absorb this in the worst way.

Mar. 25 2009 07:26 AM
Joseph Cavalieri

I am a sole proprietor of a small glass business in lower Manhattan. I will be riding my bike much more often, riding along the West Side bike path is safe, fairly quick, plus you get a great workout.

You can expect a bike ridership increase this spring and summer.

Mar. 25 2009 07:23 AM
Aimee Ross

I will be riding my bike even more than I do now!

Mar. 25 2009 07:19 AM
Mel

What is the use for hearing our voice?
when was last time that MTA cared about how it is going to affect our lives?
And I bet those people do not even need to take mass transit, whatever happens to people means nothing to them, and nothing is going to stop them.

Mar. 25 2009 07:13 AM
Odilia Rivera Santos

I will boycott the train if the increase goes through because the delays are getting much worse and the number of severely disturbed people is going up. When I ride the train, it feels as though I've stepped into a time machine and traveled back to the 80s. The smell of human excrement, screaming preachers and waiting for thirty minutes for a twenty minute train ride has lost its charm.
I will do my best to use my bike, work from home and find work closer to my apartment. I will buy winter gear for riding my bike and avoid the expense an the disgusting experience of being underground. MTA R.I.P.
Boycott the MTA

Mar. 25 2009 07:11 AM
bob laurence

The whole 'controversy' over whether the MTA will raise rates is a sham. The decision was made weeks ago. How do I know? It's been announced in posters in the subway cars, which have said for weeks that the monthly card is going up to $103. What we're watching is a ceremonial dance ratifying a decision that's already been made.

Mar. 25 2009 07:10 AM
Dawn

I feel like there are more ways to make money in NYC for the MTA. The fare hikes are going to cost the middle to lower class. People that can't already afford to spend any more money. People like me. A lot of people in this short changed economy. I honestly don't know what I'm going to do. Cut back on my already cut back spending I suppose. I need to get around for my job....Perhaps I'll ride my bicycle to the city and cut my costs. I feel like the MTA will suffer more as people find alternative ways to travel.

Mar. 25 2009 07:09 AM
Mary

I'll walk further in order to avoid the subway. (I already do this to some extent.) Good for my health as well as my budget. How nice that this is happening in Spring!

Mar. 25 2009 07:08 AM
Nanny Lee

Suggestion: Could the subway fares alter according to time and disruption? Why not have one fare for weekdays, and another lower fare when the service is disrupted on the weekends and late nights. Why should we pay the same price for a ride that A: may not be running on it's usual line or is going local when it's an express or my favorite having to go uptown to transfer downtown and the most frustrating having to take a bus shuttle. - Nanny

Mar. 25 2009 06:55 AM
Gene

it means voting against the bums in our state senate. if they can't be moved to vote against these increases, then we must move them out of their cozy offices.

Mar. 25 2009 06:40 AM
James Clarke

I’m a taxi driver, so I might get more business; unless, of course, people start to avoid coming into Manhattan unnecessarily.

Mar. 25 2009 06:39 AM
Jennifer

I get a monthly pass and have gotten one every month since I moved here in 2004. I will probably no longer get one now, because after doing the math, it doesn't seem worth the money.

It's very sad that people that need mass transit the most are going to suffer the most. What are going to be their options now?

Mar. 25 2009 06:36 AM
David

It is outrageous that East River tolls are called unfair when ALL our taxes pay so motorists can poison our air for free.

Transit riders and motorists alike both pay in taxes for each other's infrastructure.

It is way, way, way past time to start favoring TRANSIT, the less destructive mode in terms of environment, economy, and public health and safety.

IT IS TIME FOR MOTORISTS TO PAY for their congestion, which creates illness and stifles the economy. Our elected reps must STOP coddling motorists, who are inherently selfish and destructive.

Mar. 25 2009 05:34 AM

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