Streams

Carnegie Hall Corner Named for Isaac Stern

Saturday, May 17, 2003

NEW YORK (2003-05-16) Every year, New York City streets are renamed in order to commemorate the lives of local heroes or great inspirations to the people of that community. In a ceremony Friday, the City of New York honored Isaac Stern, the late violinist and Carnegie Hall President, by naming Carnegie Hall's corner at 57th Street and 7th Avenue, "Isaac Stern Place."

Stern, who saved Carnegie Hall from the wrecking ball in 1960, was appointed President of the Hall 43 years ago on May 16, and served in that capacity until his death on September 22, 2001. He presided over many high points in the hall’s history, including its renovation in 1986, its centennial in 1991, and the planning for the new Zankel Hall.

Officials who attended the naming ceremony included Kate Levin, New York City’s commissioner of Cultural Affairs and city council member Eva Moskowitz, who introduced the legislation to name the corner in the renowned violinist's honor. Also present were colleagues of Stern's, including New York Pops founder Skitch Henderson, soprano Roberta Peters, and members of the Juilliard and Emerson string quartets.

Other streets featuring famous artistic names in the area include Leonard Bernstein Place (West 65th Street, between Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue) and Alvin Ailey Place (61st Street, between West End Avenue and Amsterdam Avenue).

Additional Resources:
Isaac Stern Web site
Carnegie Hall Web site

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