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The Mostly Mozart Festival on WNYC

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Friday, July 25, 2008

This year's annual Mostly Mozart Festival at Lincoln Center is rife with sounds stretching the spectrum of Requiems, Metamorphoses, and Passions — including the American premiere of composer-in-residence Kaija Saariaho's tale of the sufferings of French mystic Simone Weil, who died of starvation in protest to the Nazi occupation of Paris in 1943.

McKnight and Child
Opening Program — Live Broadcast
Wednesday, July 30

Evening Music host Terrance McKnight is joined by Performance Today's Fred Child for this live broadcast of the Mostly Mozart Festival's opening program at Avery Fisher Hall. The concert features Mozart's Symphony No. 40 and a rare chamber version of Mahler's "Das Lied von der Erde" (The Song of the Earth), arranged in part by Arnold Schoenberg for strings, winds, piano, percussion and harmonium. This broadcast was a coproduction of American Public Media, Lincoln Center, and NPR Music.
Louis Langrée
Louis Langrée on Evening Music
Friday, July 25, 2008

MMF music director Louis Langrée talks with David Garland about Mozart's music, and what we can expect from this year's season.

Kaija Saariaho
Kaija Saariaho on Evening Music
Tuesday, August 12 at 7PM on 93.9FM

Finnish composer Kaija Saariaho joins Terrance McKnight to discuss her role as composer-in-residence for the Mostly Mozart Festival, and sheds light on her powerful stage work "La Passion de Simone" (The Passion of Simone). Written for soprano Dawn Upshaw and directed by Peter Sellars, "La Passion de Simone" also features the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra (in that organization's Mostly Mozart debut), and the renowned choral group London Voices.

A New Take on Mozart's 40th Symphony
If you can't see the video click here

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