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Road to Freedom at the Bronx Museum

Thursday, July 01, 2010

45 years after Martin Luther King Jr. led 25,000 marchers to the state capitol in Montgomery Alabama to protest denial of voting right to African Americans, the Bronx Museum is paying tribute to this historic event with photographic exhibit “Road to Freedom: The Civil Rights Movement 1958-1968 and Beyond."  Earlier this spring, several artists and photographers came together at The New School to discuss the works and their context.

 

The New School panel, and the exhibits, feature photographers Julian Cox, Doris Derby, Eric Etheridge and artist LeRoy Henderson, “Road to Freedom” stands as the most comprehensive collection of photographs ever devoted to the U.S. civil rights movement. The exhibit continues at The Bronx Museum through August 11, 2010.

Use the player above to listen to the entire event.

Featured speakers:

Holly Block: Moderator of the panel and the Executive Director of the Bronx Museum.

Julian Cox: Curator of the "Road to Freedom" exhibit. In addition to presenting the iconic images of the Civil Rights movement, Cox said, the exhibit also "sought to display images of the unknown foot soldiers, these individuals who put their lives on the line to create social change."

Doris Derbr: The photographer discusses her work in four parts: "First: women who were nationally known before the Southern Civil Rights Movement. Second: ... those who became nationally known as community and statewide leaders during and after the Civil Rights Movement. Third: those who began as student leaders who eventually became regionally or nationally known. Fourth: those women who are known on the neighborhood level, many of whom are still in Mississippi and Georgia." 

Eric Etheridge: Discusses his photo-history of all 328 Freedom Riders arrested in Jackson, Mississippi, along with 80 of his own portraits. Etheridge explains how he was able to create his book because the State of Mississippi kept  the mug shots of every single Freedom Rider arrested in Jackson.

LeRoy Henderson: Explores the images he captured during New York Civil Rights rallies throughout the 1960s--including an iconic photo of contingent leader Cornielius 'Cornbread' Gibbons.

Steven Kasher: Curated one of the first major photography exhibits on the Civil Rights Movement. Kasher discusses how he curated this exhibit, and put together his book, The Civil Rights Movement: A Photographic History.

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