Streams

Altruism, Agony, Ecstasy, and Race

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Wednesday, June 30, 2010

Delacorte Theater in Central Park, where Shakepeare in the Park plays in the summer Delacorte Theater in Central Park, where Shakepeare in the Park plays in the summer (Stephen Rees/flickr)

Oren Harman discusses 150 years of scientific attempts to explain kindness. Filmmaker Vikram Jayanti talks about his film “The Agony and the Ecstasy of Phil Spector.” Lily Rabe and Marianne Jean-Baptiste discuss their roles in this year’s Shakespeare in the Park performances. Plus, civil rights lawyer Charles Ogletree revisits the arrest of Henry Louis Gates, Jr,. to see what it says about race, class and crime in America.

The Origins of Kindness

Oren Harman discusses 150 years of scientific attempts to explain kindness. In The Price of Altruism: George Price and the Search for the Origins of Kindness he tells the story of the eccentric American genius George Price, who tried to answer evolution's greatest riddle: why does altruism exist?

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"The Agony and the Ecstasy of Phil Spector"

Director Vikram Jayanti talks about his film “The Agony and the Ecstasy of Phil Spector,” a portrait of the legendary record producer famous for creating “the wall of sound” that defined some of the greatest pop hits of the 1960s. Today, Spector is serving 19 years-to-life for the murder of B-movie actress Lana Clarkson.

“The Agony and the Ecstasy of Phil Spector” opens at Film Forum June 30. More information and tickets here.

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Shakespeare in the Park

Lily Rabe and Marianne Jean-Baptiste discuss their roles in “The Merchant of Venice,” and “The Winter’s Tale,” part of the Public Theater’s Shakespeare in the Park. They are both at the Delacorte Theater in Central Park through August 1. More information and schedule here.

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Charles Ogletree on Race, Class, and Crime in America

Charles Ogletree, one of the country’s foremost experts on civil rights, discusses the arrest of Henry Louis Gates, Jr., MacArthur Fellow and Harvard professor, for attempting to break into his own home last July, and explores issues of race, class, and crime. His book The Presumption of Guilt: The Arrest of Henry Louis Gates, Jr. and Race, Class and Crime in America is based on his years of research and his own experiences with law enforcement, and it outlines steps we should take to reach racial and legal equality for all Americans.

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Leonard's Questions: Marianne Jean-Baptiste

What was the last great novel Marianne Jean-Baptiste read? Find out what she told us after her recent appearance on The Leonard Lopate Show.

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