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Longevity

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Wednesday, June 23, 2010

pills spilling out of bottles pills spilling out of bottles (nvinacco/flickr)

We continue our series on HIV-AIDS by looking at how day-to-day life with the virus has been transformed over the decades. Then, Pulitzer Prize-winning science writer Jonathan Weiner details the quest for eternal youth and the science of immortality. And former Simpsons writer Larry Doyle talks about his satire Go, Mutants! We’ll find out about new studies that show that a sense of direction is innate. Plus, Peter Martins, New York City Ballet’s Ballet Master in Chief, discusses the NYCB’s new season, and its centerpiece, “Architecture of Dance – New Choreography and Music Festival.”

Day-to-Day Life with HIV/AIDS

Over the past two decades, day-to-day live for HIV-positive individuals has changed dramatically—mostly due to a greater understanding of the virus and a powerful drug cocktail. Dr. David Ho, Scientific Director of the Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Center and one of the developers of the HIV drug cocktail, talks about the science of fighting HIV. 

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Jonathan Weiner Discusses the Science of Immortality

Pulitzer Prize-winning science writer Jonathan Weiner talks about the quest for eternal youth and the scientists, researchers, and entrepreneurs who believe that human immortality is not only possible, but attainable in our own time. In Long for this World: The Strange Science of Immortality, Weiner meets the leading intellectuals in the field and delves into the science behind the latest research.

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Larry Doyle on Alien Teenagers

Former writer for The Simpsons, Larry Doyle, discusses his novel Go, Mutants!, a contemporary satire set in an alternate universe populated by aliens, mutants, and atomic monsters.

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Is Our Sense of Direction Innate?

Two recent studies published in Science reveal that baby rats have a basic spatial framework in their brains that help them navigate when they leave the nest for the first time, proving that a sense of direction is innate, not learned. John O'Keefe, Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience in the Institute of Behavioural Neuroscience at the University College London, joins us to explain one study and what it can show us about an innate sense of direction in humans.

A recent study reveals that baby rats have a basic spatial framework in their brains that help them navigate when they leave the nest for the first time, proving that a sense of direction is innate, not learned. John O’Keefe, Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience in the Institute of Behavioural Neuroscience at the University College London, joins us to explain the study and what it can show us about an innate sense of direction in humans.

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Peter Martins and the New York City Ballet

Peter Martins, New York City Ballet’s Ballet Master in Chief, discusses the NYCB’s new season, and its centerpiece, “Architecture of Dance – New Choreography and Music Festival.” It features scores by Thierry Escaich, Jay Greenberg, and Bruno Moretti, and Esa-Pekka Salonen, and new choreography by Melissa Barak, Mauro Bigonzetti, Peter Martins, Wayne McGregor, Benjamin Millepied, Alexei Ratmansky, and Christopher Wheeldon. More information about the 2010 season and tickets here.

 

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