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Lincoln Center Gets Its Organ Back : Slideshow

Monday, June 14, 2010

Samantha Stark/WNYC

Experienced movers, stagehands, and five Swiss organ builders all work together to unload the insument's thousands of pieces from two 48-foot trucks.

Samantha Stark/WNYC

During its four years in storage, each piece of the organ was cleaned, polished and packaged by hand.

Samantha Stark/WNYC

The majority of the organ's 4,192 pipes are made from a delicate tin. Movers can't haul the pipes over their shoulders because they might dent them. "They have to carry them in their arms like a baby," Claude Lardon, an organ builder from Kuhn, said.

Samantha Stark/WNYC

These little holes will hold some of the organs smaller pipes, which range in length 18.3' to a tenth of an inch.

Samantha Stark/WNYC

Mover Jeremy Eagle has a special connection to this delivery--his brother Harry, a musician, used to be Alice Tully's house manager, and often talked about how much he loved the organ.

Samantha Stark/WNYC

Some of the organ's pipes are carved from oak.

Samantha Stark/WNYC

The slow moving process started early in the morning and will go well into the night. No one wants to risk damaging the organ, which was designed both as a virtuoso instrument and with the capability of blending in an ensemble.

Samantha Stark/WNYC

Part of the instrument's frame is so big that movers had to forgo the inner doors of the elevator, travelling inch by inch holding onto the pieces.

Samantha Stark/WNYC

Stagehands covered the stage with paper, so as not to scratch the newly-renovated space. The organ will be re-inaugerated in November with a performance by Paul Jacobs, Chairman of the Organ Department at The Julliard school.

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