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Center for Public Integrity Gives Cuomo Plan a 'B'

Wednesday, May 26, 2010

WNYC

The Center for Public Integrity (CPI) has given presumptive Democratic gubernatorial nominee Andrew Cuomo's policy plan a "B." And that’s a good thing.

FW: not sure how i post this to politics page






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Kathleen Ehrlich

 to me
show details 2:12 PM (49 minutes ago)  

 Hey Abbie   

So this can go on the new politics page, which we created in the new cms in anticipation of the migration.  It needs a lite edit    can you take a look and put it in the new cms and then I will top you?

In the   Series  area of the article page, please associate this with Election 2010.

 

Ive requested logins for you for the OLD cms and the news blog.

Thanks!

K

 

_____________________________________________
From: Andrea Bernstein
Sent: Wednesday, May 26, 2010 2:01 PM
To: Kathleen Ehrlich
Subject: not sure how i post this to politics page

Or if it should be in news blog or both…

But here you go. 

Center for Public Integrity:  Cuomo Plan Gets a “B”

And that’s a good thing.  When it comes to ethics disclosures by legislators, New York is hardly a beam of sunshine.   Under the current law, legislators have to disclose information about outside employers, but don’t have to say how much they are paid, or who their clients are.  Nor do they have to say how much investments or real estate are really worth.   So right now, CPI gives New York a “C” for its disclosure laws, behind Hawaii and Lousiana (!) but slightly ahead of California.  In his policy “book” (link here) Cuomo proposes disclosure of client lists and “any and all outside income [elected representatives] receive.”  That would be a significant “ouch” for legislators like Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver, arguably the most powerful man in Albany right now – and also a successful lawyer.

That would move New York to a “B,” if enacted.

 Andrea Bernstein, Director, Transportation Nation

W N Y C New York Public Radio

On Twitter: TransportNation 

(        +1 646 829 4457 (office)
(        +1 917 653 0014 (cell)
*        160 Varick Street, New York, 10013

8         abernstein@wnyc.org

 

 

 

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Abbie Fentress Swanson

 to Kathleen
show details 2:14 PM (47 minutes ago)

Will do!
- Show quoted text -


On Wed, May 26, 2010 at 2:12 PM, Kathleen Ehrlich <kehrlich@wnyc.org> wrote:

Hey Abbie

So this can go on the new politics page, which we created in the new cms in anticipation of the migration. It needs a lite edit can you take a look and put it in the new cms and then I will top you?

In the Series area of the article page, please associate this with Election 2010.

 

Ive requested logins for you for the OLD cms and the news blog.

Thanks!

K

 

_____________________________________________
From: Andrea Bernstein
Sent: Wednesday, May 26, 2010 2:01 PM
To: Kathleen Ehrlich
Subject: not sure how i post this to politics page

Or if it should be in news blog or both…

But here you go. 

Center for Public Integrity:  Cuomo Plan Gets a “B”

And that’s a good thing.  When it comes to ethics disclosures by legislators, New York is hardly a beam of sunshine.   Under the current law, legislators have to disclose information about outside employers, but don’t have to say how much they are paid, or who their clients are.  Nor do they have to say how much investments or real estate are really worth.   So right now, CPI gives New York a “C” for its disclosure laws, behind Hawaii and Lousiana (!) but slightly ahead of California.  In his policy “book” (link here) Cuomo proposes disclosure of client lists and “any and all outside income [elected representatives] receive.”  That would be a significant “ouch” for legislators like Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver, arguably the most powerful man in Albany right now – and also a successful lawyer.

That would move New York to a “B,” if enacted.

 Andrea Bernstein, Director, Transportation Nation

W N Y C New York Public Radio

On Twitter: TransportNation 

(        +1 646 829 4457 (office)
(        +1 917 653 0014 (cell)
*        160 Varick Street, New York, 10013

8         abernstein@wnyc.org

 

 

 




--
Abbie Fentress Swanson
WQXR & WNYC Newsroom
dearabbie@gmail.com
Cell (718) 974-5754
http://www.wqxr.org/
http://www.wnyc.org/
http://www.abbieswanson.com
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When it comes to ethics disclosures by legislators, New York is hardly a beam of sunshine. Under the current law, legislators have to disclose information about outside employers, but don’t have to say how much about how they are paid or who their clients are. Nor do they have to say how much their real estate or investments are really worth. So right now, CPI gives New York a “C” for its disclosure laws, behind Hawaii and Louisiana (!), but slightly ahead of California.

In his 252-page policy book, Cuomo proposes disclosure of client lists and “any and all outside income [that elected representatives] receive.”  That would be a significant “ouch” for legislators like Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver, arguably the most powerful man in Albany right now--and also a successful lawyer.

If Cuomo's policy plan is enacted, CPI reports that New York's grade could move from a "C" to a “B.”

For more WNYC coverage on this story, click here.

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