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Episode #2995

"Folk Songs"

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Tuesday, October 27, 2009

Why the quotation marks? For this New Sounds we’ll hear tunes that might sound like folk songs, but are actually new songs in the folk tradition. Some actually are traditional tunes, as in those from the Carter Family repertoire – in the case of a Bill Frisell offering, and some are extensions of the tradition, which draw from rural Appalachian and early Americana. Listen to distinctive and fresh takes on old tunes from indie folk/rockers Among the Oak and Ash and new music from the Wiyos and the Chicago post-rock band Califone. Plus tunes involving the mbira, the African thumb piano, and some folktronica from the English band Tunng.

PROGRAM #2995, “Folk Songs” (First aired on Tues. 10-27-09)

ARTIST(S)

RECORDING

CUT(S)

SOURCE

Bill Frisell

The best of Bill Frisell vol. 1: Folk Songs

Sugar Baby [3:54]

Nonesuch 516092
www.nonesuch.com

Johnny Flynn & the Sussex Wit

A Larum

The Wrote and the Writ [4:07]

Vertigo Records
www.vertigorecords.co.uk

Among the Oak & Ash

Among the Oak & Ash

High, Low & Wide [5:25]

Verve Forecast B0012931 www.amongtheoakandash.com

Robin Williamson

The Iron Stone

Verses at Ellesmere [4:28]

ECM 1969
www.ecmrecords.com

Tunng

This is Tunng: mother's daughter and other songs

Song of the Sea [3:55]

Static Caravan [VAN88]
www.tunng.co.uk* or download from www.emusic.com

The Wiyos

Broken Land Bell

Redbird [2:13]

www.thewiyos.com

Califone

All My Friends Are Funeral Singers

Salt [2:53]

DOC 028 deadoceans.com
OR download from www.emusic.com

Bill Frisell

Folk Songs

Shenandoah [6:15]

See above.

Among the Oak & Ash

Among the Oak & Ash

Joseph Hillstrom 1879-1915 [3:43]

See above.

Bill Frisell

Folk Songs

Wildwood Flower [6:30]

See above.

Tunng

This is Tunng: mother's daughter and other songs

Kinky Vans [5:12]

See above.

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