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Episode #2456

New Early Music

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Saturday, September 08, 2007

Sample some new takes on early music for this New Sounds program. We’ll hear from the Japanese early music group, Danceries, and their traditional medieval and Renaissance instruments. Produced by one Ryuichi Sakamoto, this 1982 release “The End of Asia,” is a collection of songs from the 13th to the 16th centuries, coming from such countries as France, Spain, Italy, and the Netherlands. Plus, Jocelyn Montgomery (Miranda Sex Garden) and David Lynch arrange music by the 12th-century abbess Hildegard von Bingen. Listen to Montgomery’s sublime renditions from a recording called Lux Vivens, along with works from Estampie, and more.

PROGRAM # 2456 Early Music, Modern Sounds (First aired on Thurs. 9/22/05)

ARTIST(S)

RECORDING

CUT(S)

SOURCE

Ryuichi Sakamoto & Danceries

The End Of Asia

Dance [2:30]
Rondes [2:00]

Denon #7077 Available as an import. Try Amazon.com*

Estampie

Crusaders – in nomine domini

Seigneurs, sachiez [3:00]

Christophorus #77183
MusiContact
GmbH Helikon
Heuauerweg 21
69124 Heidelberg Germany

Winsome Evans & The Renaissance Players

Of Numbers And Miracles

Quen boa dona querra [5:00]

Celestial Harmonies #13091** www.harmonies.com *

Estampie

Crusaders – in nomine domini

Imperator rex graecorum [5:00]

See above.

Winsome Evans & The Renaissance Players

Of Numbers And Miracles

Assi Pod A Virgen [8:00]

See above.

Jocelyn Montgomery w/David Lynch

Lux Vivens – music of Hildegard Von Bingen

Et Ideo [3:30]

Mammoth 980183**
Available at Amazon.com*

Jan Garbarek & The Hilliard Ensemble

Officium

Beata Viscera [6:30]

ECM #1525 ** www.ecmrecords.com*

Jocelyn Montgomery w/David Lynch

Lux Virens – music of Hildegard Von Bingen

Viridissima [5:00]

See above.

John Renbourn

The Black Balloon

The English Dance [3:00]

Shanachie 97009** www.shanachie.com

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