Streams

Episode #1557

Hiroshima Remembered

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Saturday, August 06, 2005

For the 60th anniversary of the bombing of Hiroshima, listen to music written to commemorate the occasion, including a work by Raphael Mostel written for the lantern-floating ceremony on the banks of the Ota River in Hiroshima.. Also, hear Toshiya Sukegawa's 'the eternal morning 1945.8.6,' along with Krystof Penderecki's "Threnody for the Victims of Hiroshima." Plus, music by Jocelyn Pook, and more.

PROGRAM # 1557, Music for the Anniversary of the Bombing of Hiroshima, August 6, 1945 (First aired on August 6, 1998

ARTIST(S)

RECORDING

CUT(S)

SOURCE

Raphael Mostel

Blood On The Moon

The River, excerpt [1:30]

Digital Fossils #10009**
Order through www.mostel.com

Jocelyn Pook

Invocation

Oppenheimer [6:30]

Six Degrees ##314 524 441** www.sixdegreesrecords.com *

Toshiya Sukegawa

Music from Six Continents, 1992 Series

The Eternal Morning 1945.8.6 [20:00]

Vienna Music Masters #3006. www.xs4all.nl/~gdv/vmm

Raphael Mostel

Blood On The Moon

Swiftly, How Swiftly [5:00]/Blood On The Moon [7:00]/The Eternal Return [3:30]

See above.

Krzysztof Penderecki

Threnody/Viola Concerto/others

Threnody for the Victims of Hiroshima, excerpt [4:00]

Conifer #168.** Out of print. But there are other recordings currently available, one on EMI, #65077. Try Amazon.com* OR another on Naxos, #8554491, also through Amazon.com*

*, ** - Find the recordings you've heard - go to the New Sounds Recordings Information page

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