Streams

Jozef van Wissem

« previous episode | next episode »

Sunday, April 11, 2010

Dutch composer and performer Jozef van Wissem builds music with the sonorities of his unusual instrument: a 24-string Baroque lute.

The instrument is old-style, but the music is modern, drawing on minimalism and trance music as well as the lute's roots to conjure a timeless experience. Jozef van Wissem joins host David Garland to talk about and perform his music in the WNYC Studio.

view photos of the session

Jozef van Wissem on MySpace

Jozef van Wissem on UbuWeb (includes free downloads)

News, weather, Radiolab, Brian Lehrer and more.
Get the best of WNYC in your inbox, every morning.

Comments [4]

Kenneth Bennett Lane from Lake Hiawatha, NJ

The lute sound is antiquely unique and when played by an artist of consummate musicianship and imagination it can evoke an otherworldly ambience. In today's world the calming influence of the lute can be most welcome.
Kenneth Bennett Lane, heldentenor & opera composer
Director, Richard Wagner Music Drama Institute
www.WagnerOpera.com

Apr. 12 2010 06:06 PM
Kenneth Bennett Lane from Lake Hiawatha, NJ

The lute sound is antiquely unique and when played by an artist of consummate musicianship and imagination it can evoke an otherworldly ambience. In today's world the calming influence of the lute can be most welcome.
Kenneth Bennett Lane, heldentenor & opera composer
Director, Richard Wagner Music Drama Institute
www.WagnerOpera.com

Apr. 12 2010 06:06 PM
elayne Dix from nyc ny

What are the titles of the pieces played by Jozef van wissem.?

I caught a good portion of the music and talk. its is thrilling.
Thank you so much for such a wonderful program
elayne

Apr. 11 2010 11:32 PM
fernando luiz de moura from i ai brazilia

guns n roses sweet child o´mine good bye

Apr. 11 2010 08:24 PM

Leave a Comment

Register for your own account so you can vote on comments, save your favorites, and more. Learn more.
Please stay on topic, be civil, and be brief.
Email addresses are never displayed, but they are required to confirm your comments. Names are displayed with all comments. We reserve the right to edit any comments posted on this site. Please read the Comment Guidelines before posting. By leaving a comment, you agree to New York Public Radio's Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use.