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Thursday, May 06, 2010

Music icon Willie Nelson talks about his career in music and his latest album. Christopher Corbett discusses his new novel The Poker Bride, about a Chinese woman in the American west during the Gold Rush. Also, Damon Wayans talks about his career in comedy and describes writing his first novel. Plus, our latest Underreported segments.

Willie Nelson

Country music legend Willie Nelson talks about his long career in music, what keeps him inspired, and what it was like to work with producer T Bone Burnett and an all-star posse of pickers, including Buddy Miller, Ronnie McCoury, and Riley Baugus on his latest album, "Country Music."

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The Poker Bride

Christopher Corbett discusses his novel, The Poker Bride. It’s based on a little-known legend about Polly, a young Chinese concubine at an Idaho mining camp who was traded in a poker game during the gold rush of 1849. Years later, when the gold rush receded and the Chinese miners ...

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Damon Wayans

Award-winning actor, stand-up comedian, writer, and producer Damon Wayans, talks about becoming famous on his brother Keenen Ivory Wayans's hit show, "In Living Color," his career in television and movies since then, and writing his first novel, Red Hats.

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Underreported: Niger's Food Crisis

Erratic weather in Niger has disrupted production of millet, one the country’s staple food crops. Now, upwards of 60 percent of the population there is facing hunger. We’ll talk to Concern Worldwide’s country director in Niger, Niall Tierney about the crisis on today’s first Underreported segment.

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Update: Shaping Iraq's Future

NPR’s Baghdad Bureau Chief Quil Lawrence discusses Iraq, the disputed election there, and what lies ahead as the U.S. military prepares to start drawing down troops over the course of the summer.

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