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Wednesday, April 07, 2010

On today's show we’ll get a glimpse into how Lehman Brothers’ was undone from within. Then, Norris Church Mailer talks about her complicated 30-plus-year marriage to Norman Mailer. Also, Henri Cartier-Bresson was one of the most influential photographers of the 20th century, We’ll talk to his widow and to the curator of a new exhibit of his work at MoMA. And to top things off: the one and only Carol Burnett!

The Devil’s Casino

Vicky Ward tells the story of the four close friends who re-created Lehman Brothers—setting out to prove that ambitious and savvy men with no financial training could take on the Ivy-League-educated white shoe bankers on Wall Street. In The Devil’s Casino: Friendship, Betrayal, and the High Stakes Games Played ...

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A Ticket to the Circus

Norman Mailer’s wife of more than thirty years, Norris Church Mailer, talks about leaving the comforts of small-town Arkansas and meeting and falling in love in with Norman Mailer in one night. Her memoir A Ticket to the Circus, she describes the challenges—and rewards—of life with Norman Mailer, from ...

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Henri Cartier-Bresson

Henri Cartier-Bresson was one of the most original, accomplished, influential, and beloved figures in the history of photography. Martine Franck, photographer and widow of Cartier-Bresson, and Peter Galassi, Chief Curator in the Department of Photography at the Museum of Modern Art, discuss the photographer’s career and extraordinary body of ...

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Time Together with Carol Burnett

Carol Burnett discusses becoming one of the pioneering queens of television comedy and describes what went on behind the scenes of "The Carol Burnett Show," which ran on CBS from 1967 to 1978. Her book This Time Together: Laughter and Reflection looks back at her friendships and her remarkable ...

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