Streams

Asian Carp and the Great Lakes

Wednesday, March 17, 2010

Jennifer Nalbone, director of navigation and invasive species at Great lakes United, explains the threat posed by the Asian carp, which have migrated north up the Mississippi River and are heading toward the Great Lakes. She’ll talk about the plans to prevent them from reaching the Great Lakes, where they would cause massive ecological damage.

Guests:

Jennifer Nalbone,
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Comments [5]

Steve from Hoboken, NJ

@LM(#2):

Yes, but of course merely a sub-species of the world's most invasive species - humans, the great pillagers and despoilers.

The carp have just as much of a right to exist and proliferate as we do. To the extent that they interfere with our recreational habits, this is certainly no "crisis". And besides, we brought them here in the first place. That's what we get for messing with Mother Nature.

Mar. 17 2010 03:39 PM
John from Oakland, NJ

I agree with the other listener. Somebody should develop a market for catching Asian carp and selling it for food, fertilizer, fish food, etc. It must be used as a food fish in Asia. The government could provide some initial incentives to get the market started.

Mar. 17 2010 01:18 PM
smidely

was waiting for the "so that's why i care!" moment ...still waiting...

Mar. 17 2010 01:00 PM
LM

I would of thought that jet skiers and boats are invasive species.

Mar. 17 2010 12:52 PM
adsf

I was just reading that some small, tasty Atlantic fish are being fished out because they are used as fertilizer, animal feed and even cosmetics. Is there a movement to switch from endangered or valuable fish to carp to replenish those markets?

Mar. 17 2010 12:51 PM

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