Streams

Underreported: Accelerated Tree Growth and Climate Change

Thursday, March 11, 2010

Geoffrey Parker, a forest ecologist at the Smithsonian Institution has been measuring the size and rate of growth of tree trunks for 22 years. After looking at his data, he determined that many of the trees he was surveying were growing at rate two to four times faster than expected and climate change may be to blame. We’ll speak to Mr. Parker for our second Underreported segment.

Guests:

Geoffrey Parker,
News, weather, Radiolab, Brian Lehrer and more.
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Comments [3]

Amy from Manhattan

A few years ago I read in the online magazine Grist (grist.org) that crops exposed to high levels of CO2 would grow faster & that some people thought this would help against world hunger. But apparently the CO2 would displace enough nitrogen in the atmosphere that the crops would have less nutritional value than normal. I think this article focused on ground crops--might the effect on tree fruits be similar?

Mar. 11 2010 01:57 PM
Todd Kaufmann from Pittsburgh, PA

What about other vegetative growth?
How much does this lag or lead increased (human) CO2 release?

What other economic effects of change in plant growth (and regions) ?

Will tree farm companies need to change their plans?

Poison Ivy and others have increased urushiol levels/strength in result to CO2 increases; what others?

Mar. 11 2010 01:57 PM
Mike C. from Tribeca

I'm sure I'm not the only listener looking forward to this interview. Hopefully, Jesse Ventura will be listening in as well.

Mar. 11 2010 01:28 PM

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