Streams

Experiments in Science and Art

« previous episode | next episode »

Monday, March 08, 2010

Bruce Lourie talks about becoming a human guinea pig to investigate the toxins in everyday household objects—from toothpaste to rubber ducks. And we’ll look into the life of Victor Fleming—the man behind “The Wizard of Oz” and “Gone with the Wind.” Then we’ll learn about a museum exhibition designed to find out how art affects our brains. Plus, Thornton Wilder’s nephew, Tappan Wilder, discusses the enduring appeal of “Our Town”—the latest revival is enjoying a long run here in New York. And we'll end with a visit from Patty Duke!

Leonard Lopate has been with WNYC for 25 years! You’re invited to celebrate his anniversary at a star-studded roast on March 25th! Find out more and buy tickets here!

Oscar Winners on the Leonard Lopate Show
Leonard spoke with screenwriter Mark Boal, who won the Oscar for best original screenplay, and director/producer Kathryn Bigelow, who won the Oscar for best director, discuss "The Hurt Locker," this year’s best picture winner. You can listen to that interview from July 2009 here.

Actor Jeff Bridges was on the Lopate Show in December to discuss "Crazy Heart," and last night he won an Oscar for best actor in the movie. You can listen to that interview here.

Christoph Waltz, who stars in Quentin Tarantino's "Inglourious Basterds," was on the Lopate Show in August, and he talked about playing such a glorious villain. You can listen to that interview here.

Filmmaker Louie Psihoyos and Ric O'Barry, spoke with Leonard about the documentary "The Cove," which won the Oscar for best documentary. You can listen to that interview here.

Guests:

Kathryn Bigelow, Mark Boal, Jeff Bridges, Ric O'Barry,, Louie Psihoyos and Christoph Waltz,

Slow Death by Rubber Duck

Pollution is not just caused by industrial smokestacks; it’s also caused by commonplace items in our homes and workplaces. Bruce Lourie discusses pollution in our modern world. Slow Death by Rubber Duck: The Secret Danger of Everyday Things, written with Rick Smith, looks into the corporate manufacturers of toxins, ...

Comments [33]

Victor Fleming

Michael Sragow talks about the life and career of Victor Fleming, who made films across range of genres, from westerns, to screwball comedies to romances. He’s best remembered for “Gone With the Wind” and “The Wizard of Oz,” as well as other classics. Victor Fleming: An American Movie Master ...

Comments [2]

Beauty and the Brain

Neeraja Balachander, of the Zanvyl Krieger Mind-Brain Institute at The Johns Hopkins University, and Gary Vikan, director of the Walters Art Museum in Baltimore, and curator of the exhibition “Beauty and the Brain: A Neural Approach to Aesthetics,” talk about that exhibition, which is an experiment on how ...

Comment

Our Town

Tappan Wilder, Thornton Wilder’s nephew, discusses the enduring appeal of "Our Town," and David Cromer’s award-winning staging of "Our Town," the longest-running production of the play in its 71-year history; its record-breaking 337th performance was on December 16th. The production just passed its one-year anniversary on February 26. ...

Comments [1]

Patty Duke Remembers Anne Bancroft

Actress Patty Duke stops by to discuss her career, and the career of her fellow actress, Anne Bancroft. Both Bancroft and Duke originated the roles of Annie Sullivan and Helen Keller in “The Miracle Worker” on Broadway, then went on to do the film which brought them both Academy Awards ...

Comments [4]

Leonard's Questions: Patty Duke

What is Patty Duke into? She answers our questions after a recent appearance on The Leonard Lopate Show.

Comment

News, weather, Radiolab, Brian Lehrer and more.
Get the best of WNYC in your inbox, every morning.

Leave a Comment

Register for your own account so you can vote on comments, save your favorites, and more. Learn more.
Please stay on topic, be civil, and be brief.
Email addresses are never displayed, but they are required to confirm your comments. Names are displayed with all comments. We reserve the right to edit any comments posted on this site. Please read the Comment Guidelines before posting. By leaving a comment, you agree to New York Public Radio's Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use.